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1935 Bentley relegated to the cart after a failed MOT in 1968 will fetch up to £70,000

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A rare Bentley that has sat in a shed for over 50 years is set to fetch up to £70,000 at auction.

The car – a Bentley 3.5 liter – rolled off the production line in Derby in 1935 and was then delivered to the wealthy owner of the tea merchant, who lived in Sydney, Australia.

After being returned to the UK in the early 1950s, the car was bought at auction for £1,050 – the equivalent of over £20,000 in today’s money – by Dorset-based farmer James Young.

The farmer then spent a further £500 refinishing the car from its original yellow to black.

When the Bentley passed the MOT in 1968, it was stored in the barn of the farm wagon and – apart from a single appearance in 1971 – it has remained there continuously ever since.

The current owner, the farmer’s grandson, is now selling the dilapidated classic car through Charterhouse auction house, based in Sherborne, Dorset.

When the Bentley 3.5 liter model was originally for sale, it was described in advertisements as a ‘perfect piece of mechanism’, but the one up for sale now needs urgent restoration before it can work again.

A rare Bentley that has sat in a shed for over 50 years is set to fetch up to £70,000 at auction. The car – a Bentley 3.5 liter – rolled off the production line in Derby in 1935 and was then delivered to the wealthy owner of the tea merchant, who lived in Sydney, Australia.

After the car was built, wealthy tea merchant Philip Bushell had a Drop Head Coupe body assembled by coachbuilders Thrupp and Maberly, turning it into a convertible.  Above: The car outside Busshells Sydney headquarters in 1936

After the car was built, wealthy tea merchant Philip Bushell had a Drop Head Coupe body assembled by coachbuilders Thrupp and Maberly, turning it into a convertible. Above: The car outside Busshells Sydney headquarters in 1936

The car first came out of its stable since 1968 when the farmer’s grandson, Roger Young, made minor repairs in 1971.

He also removed the winged B radiator cap to keep it safe.

It had been the intention of the seller to have the car restored, but he could not fulfill his ambition.

Auctioneer Richard Bromell said, “Growing up as a kid, I thought every farm had old buildings hiding classic and vintage cars.”

“While I’ve seen and sold many barn finds in Charterhouse over the decades, this one certainly surpasses all other previous discoveries.”

After the car was built, wealthy tea merchant Philip Bushell had a Drop Head Coupe body assembled by coachbuilders Thrupp and Maberly, turning it into a convertible.

A photo from 1936 shows the car outside the Bushells headquarters in Sydney.

The lower estimate for the sale – which takes place on October 12 at the prestigious Haynes International Motor Museum in Sparkford, Somerset – is £50,000.

After being returned to the UK in the early 1950s, the car was bought at auction for £1,050 - the equivalent of over £20,000 in today's money - by Dorset-based farmer James Young.  Above: The derelict engine

After being returned to the UK in the early 1950s, the car was bought at auction for £1,050 – the equivalent of over £20,000 in today’s money – by Dorset-based farmer James Young. Above: The derelict engine

The car still has its original leather seats but needs an extensive restoration before it can drive again.  The owner's wife said it's a 'beautiful car'

The car still has its original leather seats but needs an extensive restoration before it can drive again. The owner’s wife said it’s a ‘beautiful car’

Mr Young’s wife Linda said: Wales News: ‘At the moment there is little rust and the leather is just as it was.

“We were told we did the right thing by keeping the roof of the car on as it protected it.

A 1936 Daily Mail advertisement for the Bentley 3.5 Liter quoted the then popular inventor and racing driver George Eyston

A 1936 Daily Mail advertisement for the Bentley 3.5 Liter quoted the then popular inventor and racing driver George Eyston

“It’s a beautiful car with many memories for the family, so we’re sad to let it go, but it would be nice if someone could get her back on the road and take care of her.”

Born in Liverpool in 1879, Bushell moved to Australia at the age of 11 and started working for his father’s tea company.

He then set up his own company with his brother and the business grew rapidly, with offices elsewhere in Australia.

The businessman died in March 1954 at his home in Sydney.

Bentleys from the 1930s are called Derby Bentleys because they were built at the Rolls-Royce factory in Derby.

Rolls-Royce bought the Bentley brand in 1931. Bentleys before that date are known as Cricklewood Bentleys, named after the original factory in London.

When the 3.5 liter hit the market, it was advertised as the ‘quiet sports car’, a boast that Rolls-Royce continued to use into the 1950s.

A 1936 Daily Mail advertisement for the Bentley 3.5 Liter quoted the then popular inventor and racing driver George Eyston.

It read: ‘I’ve had a 3 1/2 liter Bentley for almost a year now and I’d like to say I’ve loved every moment I’ve had with it.

The car has been gathering dust in a cart shed in Dorset since 1968 when it was parked after failing to pass the MOT

The car has been gathering dust in a cart shed in Dorset since 1968 when it was parked after failing to pass the MOT

The car's last tax bracket, which cost £17.10 and expired in December 1968, is still visible.  The car was put in the garage after the MOT was not successful

The car’s last tax bracket, which cost £17.10 and expired in December 1968, is still visible. The car was put in the garage after the MOT was not successful

The car first came out of its stable since 1968, when the farmer's grandson, Roger Young, made minor repairs in 1971.  He also removed the winged B radiator cap to keep it safe.

The radiator cap

The car first came out of its stable since 1968 when the farmer’s grandson, Roger Young, made minor repairs in 1971. He also removed the winged B radiator cap (right) for safekeeping

The car is now covered in cobwebs and needs urgent attention to be restored to its former glory.  It is sold by Charterhouse Auctioneers of Dorset

The car is now covered in cobwebs and needs urgent attention to be restored to its former glory. It is sold by Charterhouse Auctioneers of Dorset

The car has only 13,145 miles on the clock, despite being built in 1935.  The interior features original wood paneling and leather seats

The car has only 13,145 miles on the clock, despite being built in 1935. The interior features original wood paneling and leather seats

When the 3.5 liter hit the market, it was advertised as the 'quiet sports car', a boast that Rolls-Royce continued to use into the 1950s.  Above: the steering wheel of the car is covered in cobwebs

When the 3.5 liter hit the market, it was advertised as the ‘quiet sports car’, a boast that Rolls-Royce continued to use into the 1950s. Above: the steering wheel of the car is covered in cobwebs

The car has not left its current location since 1971, when it was briefly taken away to carry out minor repairs.  Then it went back in

The car has not left its current location since 1971, when it was briefly taken away to carry out minor repairs. Then it went back in

The car also comes with the original manual.  The lower estimate for the sale - taking place on October 12 at the prestigious Haynes International Motor Museum in Sparkford, Somerset - is £50,000

The car also comes with the original manual. The lower estimate for the sale – taking place on October 12 at the prestigious Haynes International Motor Museum in Sparkford, Somerset – is £50,000

The Thrupp and Maberly logo can be seen on part of the car.  The company has equipped it with a Drop Head Coupe body

The Thrupp and Maberly logo can be seen on part of the car. The company has equipped it with a Drop Head Coupe body

“Your engineers seem to have studied every point and the car is a perfect piece of mechanics.

‘Above all, I think it’s very good sound value – I can make the longest journey in the shortest time with a minimum of fatigue and it’s a new pleasure every time.

“It’s the most economical to drive, and of all modes of transport these days I say ‘go with Bentley – it’s the healthiest ‘purchase’ I’ve ever made.”

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