Amazon deliverers are waging legal battle for workers’ rights

Amazon couriers fight legal battle for workers’ rights, including minimum wage and vacation pay

  • Thousands of Amazon deliverers are waging legal battles for workers’ rights
  • About 3,000 drivers ‘are entitled to £10,500 each for each year they have supplied’
  • Self-employed persons are not entitled to minimum wage and holiday pay










Thousands of Amazon deliverers have launched a legal battle for workers’ rights, including minimum wages and vacation pay.

British law firm Leigh Day believes at least 3,000 drivers could be entitled to an average compensation of £10,500 each for each year they have delivered goods for the US online giant.

The drivers are classified as self-employed, which means that they are not entitled to minimum wage and holiday pay.

Leigh Day, which is making similar claims against Uber, Addison Lee, delivery company Stuart and used car market BCA, argues that drivers hired through third-party delivery companies to make deliveries for Amazon should be given rights that employees enjoy.

Drivers who spoke to the law firm claimed that they are given estimated travel times between deliveries that they must meet through an app.

They also described how they cannot return packages to the depot and thus have to use extra fuel to redeliver at the end of the day. This, coupled with the costs of hiring a van, fuel and insurance, could generate very little income, according to the UK law firm.

An Amazon spokesperson told MailOnline: “We are extremely proud of the drivers who work with our partners across the country to give our customers what they want, when they want, wherever they are.

“We are committed to ensuring that these drivers are fairly compensated by the delivery companies they work with and that they are treated with respect, and this is reflected in the positive feedback we hear from drivers every day.”

Thousands of Amazon deliverers have launched a legal battle for workers’ rights, including minimum wages and vacation pay.

British law firm Leigh Day believes at least 3,000 drivers could be entitled to an average compensation of £10,500 each for each year they have delivered goods for the US online giant

British law firm Leigh Day believes at least 3,000 drivers could be entitled to an average compensation of £10,500 each for each year they have delivered goods for the US online giant

Currently, drivers who deliver on behalf of Amazon through “Delivery Service Partners” are classified as self-employed, so they do not enjoy employee rights such as vacation pay, at least the national minimum wage and an employment contract.

Delivery man Bill Lightfoot, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, said: “The work is terrible because Amazon controls everything you do.

“There were times when I was gone on delivery, and I stopped for a few minutes, and they called and asked why I was parked.

“The money I made was nowhere near my rent and bills. In one week I worked 36 hours in four days and I should have made £464 but they gave me £2.74. It doesn’t sound believable, but it’s true.

“I was very unhappy delivering for them. In fact, I paid them to make their deliveries, rather than the other way around.’

Leigh Day claims drivers hired through third-party delivery companies to make deliveries for Amazon should be given rights that employees enjoy

Leigh Day claims drivers hired through third-party delivery companies to make deliveries for Amazon should be given rights that employees enjoy

Kate Robinson, a lawyer on Leigh Day’s employment team, said: “It’s time for Amazon to stop putting profits before people and give delivery drivers the labor rights they deserve.”

She added: “Amazon is running short on switching drivers who deliver on their behalf. This is disgraceful behavior from a company that makes billions of pounds a year.

“Drivers who deliver for Amazon have to work regular shifts and book time off, but Amazon claims they are self-employed.

Paying out a £140 million fee sounds like a big bill, but for a company that made a £5.8 billion profit in the first three months of 2021, it’s a drop in the ocean.

“For drivers, on the other hand, earning at least the national minimum wage, getting vacation pay and having a good employment contract can be life-changing.”

Leigh Day brought and won a landmark case on behalf of Uber drivers for workers’ rights in February this year.

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