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Apple’s Emergency SOS is free for 2 years on iPhone 14, but firm doesn’t want to talk about costs in the long run

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Apple’s new Emergency SOS satellite feature — available for free on all iPhone 14 models for two years — could cost consumers afterward, but the company won’t discuss its pricing plans.

The service announced this week aims to connect you with emergency response professionals when you’re in a remote location without cell towers and Wi-Fi – it’s launching in November, two months after the new smartphone hit the market on September 16. market comes.

Apple is partnering with Globalstar’s network of satellites to allow users to send text messages directly to emergency services when they have no other means of connecting.

The tech giant hasn’t announced how much the new feature will cost after two years or whether people who buy a new iPhone after the 14th would get the service for free — and didn’t respond to a question from DailyMail.com about the price.

The tech giant has partnered with Globalstar’s network of satellites to allow users to send text messages directly to emergency services when they have no other connectivity options.

Apple's new Emergency SOS satellite feature — available for free on all iPhone 14 models for two years — may cost consumers afterward, but the company won't discuss its pricing plans

Apple’s new Emergency SOS satellite feature — available for free on all iPhone 14 models for two years — may cost consumers afterward, but the company won’t discuss its pricing plans

As part of the deal, Globalstar says it would allocate 85% of its network capacity to Apple, while the California-based tech company will fund 95% of the costs for a new generation of satellites that Globalstar ordered in February in a $327 million contract.

As part of the deal, Globalstar says it would allocate 85% of its network capacity to Apple, while the California-based tech company will fund 95% of the costs for a new generation of satellites that Globalstar ordered in February in a $327 million contract.

Longtime Apple reporter Dan Moren say“If we delay that decision for two years, Apple may have time to see how many people are actually using it and what the price should look like then.”

“Or it could extend the date after that because it looks bad to provide a handy emergency feature that could potentially become unusable without a fee,” continues Moren, adding that the famed company doesn’t want to squeeze its lips over how people have been rescued. if only they had paid for the emergency function.

As part of the deal, Globalstar says it would allocate 85% of its network capacity to Apple, while the California-based tech company will fund 95% of the costs for a new generation of satellites that Globalstar ordered in February in a $327 million contract.

Reuters reported that Apple is investing $450 million in satellite infrastructure, with a majority going to Globalstar.

Apple reporter Dan Moren says: 'If we delay that decision for two years, Apple may have time to see how many people are actually using it and what the price should look like then'

Apple reporter Dan Moren says: ‘If we delay that decision for two years, Apple may have time to see how many people are actually using it and what the price should look like then’

“It has taken years to make this vision a reality through groundbreaking hardware, software and infrastructure innovation,” said Ashley Williams, manager of satellite modeling and simulation at Apple, at the Far Out event.

Apple notes on his site that a user with a direct view of the sky and horizon can send an emergency message in 15 seconds, but it can take more than a minute if there are trees with medium foliage in the way.

“It has taken years to realize this vision through groundbreaking hardware, software and infrastructure innovation,” said Ashley Williams, Apple’s satellite modeling and simulation manager, at the Far Out event.

The emergency messages—which appear in gray as opposed to the default green or blue—automatically share your medical ID and emergency contact information (if you’ve set them up), your location, answers to the emergency questionnaire, and your iPhone’s remaining battery life.

At launch, the service will only support US English, US Spanish, and Canadian French. Users must have the iPhone 14 and iOS software update in November.

On Thursday, SpaceX founder Elon Musk said his company has had some talks with Apple about working together to use Starlink satellite connectivity with them.

“We’ve had promising discussions with Apple about Starlink connectivity. iPhone team is based on super smart. Closing the link from space to the phone will certainly work best if the phone software and hardware adapt to space-based signals versus Starlink purely emulating a cell tower,” Musk said on Twitter.

Apple’s latest iPhone 14 starts at $799 and the Plus is $899, despite rumors of major price increases ahead of this week’s launch.

About privacy and the new feature, Apple says on its website: “When you text with Emergency SOS via satellite, your messages are sent in encrypted form and decrypted by Apple to pass to the relevant emergency center or emergency relay center.

‘Your messages may be retained by emergency centers and the relay provider to improve their services, and in accordance with applicable law.’

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