Australian schoolchildren as young as six mimic gory Netflix hit Squid Game

‘DON’T WATCH SQUID GAME’: Parents warned not to show their kids Netflix’s biggest hit ever after schoolchildren were caught imitating violent scenes from gory series

  • Sydney school tells parents to ban their kids from watching Squid Game
  • Similar warnings have been issued across Australia and around the world
  • Korean series is the biggest launch in Netflix streaming service history
  • 111 million people have watched the show since its debut on September 17
  • ‘Remember your children’s ability to access inappropriate content’










Australian schools are warning parents not to let their kids watch Squid Game after students were caught imitating violent scenes from the Netflix horror series.

The South Korean program, the most popular in Netflix history, revolves around a fictional game show in which poverty-stricken characters compete in a series of death games to win a $50 million cash prize.

It features gruesome scenes of characters being shot in the head and of others having their organs harvested.

The show is not intended to be seen by young children.

A scene from the Netflix show Squid Game, which Australian schools have warned about, is being copied by children as young as six

Elementary school kids say they've seen Squid Game, which is rated MA meaning it's only meant to be seen by an adult audience

Elementary school kids say they’ve seen Squid Game, which is rated MA meaning it’s only meant to be seen by an adult audience

As children in NSW return to school after the lockdown, it is feared that many of them have had unsupervised access to violent streaming TV shows while at home for months.

A Sydney school principal was so concerned about Squid Game and other violent shows that she wrote a letter to parents.

“Squid Game features scenes depicting extreme violence and bloodshed, strong language and terrifying moments that, by the rating, are simply not appropriate for primary and early secondary school children,” said Linda Wickham, the principal of Dulwich Hill Public School in Sydney’s inner west, wrote to parents.

Squid Game revolves around a fictional game show where poverty-stricken characters compete in a series of death games

Squid Game revolves around a fictional game show where poverty-stricken characters compete in a series of death games

She said six-year-olds said they’ve seen the show, which is rated MA meaning it’s only meant to be seen by an adult audience.

Ms. Wickham told parents that Squid Game features “an aggressive version of a familiar kid’s game, red light, green light.”

“This and other inappropriate content negatively impacts playground games.”

She advised parents to change their Netflix account settings to prevent kids from watching the show, which has been seen by 111 million people since its September 17 debut.

A scene from the Korean show Squid Game, copied in schools around the world

A scene from the Korean show Squid Game, copied in schools around the world

‘Violent language and aggressive behavior can be easily imitated by children, especially outside the confines of your home and in the wider space of a school playground,’ warned Mrs Wickham.

“Denying your children’s capacity to access inappropriate content … will certainly help keep them safe and their growing minds sane.”

Schools in Australia and in the UK, US, Europe and Asia have issued similar warnings.

A school in Perth said the level of violence on the show was “very intense.” “We have noticed that the Squid Game series is being discussed by some of our students and that games based on this series are starting to appear on the playground,” the Sydney Morning Herald quoted a letter to parents as saying.

Masks inspired Squid Game on display with other masks at Yiwu Wholesale Market in Yiwu, China

Masks inspired Squid Game on display with other masks at Yiwu Wholesale Market in Yiwu, China

In England, John Jolly, CEO of the charity Parentkind, said: ‘If there are concerns about safety… parents should assess whether or not it is appropriate for their child.

“They should use parental controls to decide, just as they should when it comes to adult themed entertainment their child wants to see,” he said.

Another British school contacted parents to say it was inappropriate to pretend to shoot other children on the playground.

“Children who watch (Squid Game) are exposed to graphically realistic scenes of violence and unfortunately children exhibit this behavior in the playground, which will not be tolerated,” the school said.

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