Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Belgian pilot miraculously survives plane crash as his plane lands parachuted to Earth

0

- Advertisement -

Belgian pilot miraculously survives plane crash as his plane lands nose to earth after a mid-air emergency

  • Pilot flew the small sports plane near Bruges when he got into trouble
  • He deployed the aircraft’s Ballistic Recovery System (BRS) and launched a parachute
  • Images from the ground showed the aircraft hanging from the canopy with the nose forward
  • With a loud crash, the plane propeller landed first on the side of a road
  • Miraculously, the pilot survived the crash and was treated for minor injuries

This is when a pilot miraculously survived a plane crash in which his plane had to parachute nose to earth following an airborne emergency in Belgium.

Video taken from the ground captured the descent of the plane, which ran into trouble somewhere near the city of Bruges on Friday.

According to reports, witnesses heard an explosion in the sky above them. When they looked up, they saw the plane coming down steadily from the sky.

Pictured: The plane descends to the ground with a parachute behind it

Pictured: This is when a pilot miraculously survived a plane crash that left his plane parachuting down to Earth following an aerial emergency in Belgium

At first in the images the plane appears to be traveling slowly, but as it approaches the ground and drifts over trees and lampposts it is clear that it is coming down with some speed

With a loud crash, the plane lands propeller-first on the side of a road in Sint-Andries, the left wing crashes on top of a white van and a fence

At first in the footage, the plane appears to be traveling slowly, but as it approaches the ground and drifts over trees and lampposts, it is clear that it is coming down with some speed. With a loud crash, the plane lands propeller-first on the side of a road in Sint-Andries, the left wing crashes on top of a white van and a fence

It was at this point that footage of the incident began, showing the small plane hovering under the canopy of the red-and-white parachute, swaying in the wind as it descended.

At first, the plane appears to be traveling slowly, but as it approaches the ground and drifts over trees and lampposts, it is clear that it is coming down with some speed.

With a loud crash, the plane lands propeller-first on the side of a road in Sint-Andries, with the left wing crashing into a white van and a fence.

The fence and van propped up the plane so that it landed in the same position it had when it came back to Earth, with its tail pointed skyward.

Miraculously, the pilot survived the crash and walked away with only minor injuries.

In the photo: the aftermath of the plane crash.  Firefighters and other rescuers can be seen in the background, with foam used by firefighters on the floor under the plane

In the photo: the aftermath of the plane crash. Firefighters and other rescuers can be seen in the background, with foam used by firefighters on the floor under the plane

Pictured: The plane is shown in the position it landed in, supported by a fence and a van

Pictured: The aircraft is shown in the position it landed in, supported by a fence and a van

Officials, who described the pilot as experienced, said he was being treated. They didn’t name him.

They noted that the pilot’s decision to deploy the Ballistic Recovery System (BRS), which launches the parachute, almost certainly saved his life.

Firefighters attended the scene as a precaution against possible oil spills, with photos of the aftermath of the crash showing foam on the road around the plane.

Pictured: Firefighters work at the crash site as a precaution against potential oil spills

Pictured: Firefighters work at the crash site as a precaution against possible oil spills

Pictured: The bottom of the plane is shown in this photo from the crash site

Pictured: The bottom of the plane is shown in this photo from the crash site

According to Aviation A2Z, the plane involved in Friday's crash was a Dyn'Aéro MCR01 - a two-seat light carbon fiber aircraft (photo, file photo)

According to Aviation A2Z, the plane involved in Friday’s crash was a Dyn’Aéro MCR01 – a two-seat light carbon fiber aircraft (photo, file photo)

Aviation authorities have launched an investigation into the cause of the crash. It was not reported what the emergency situation the pilot was facing was.

According to Aviation A2Z, the plane involved in Friday’s crash was a Dyn’Aéro MCR01 – a light two-seat carbon fiber aircraft.

A Ballistic Recovery System is designed to prevent a ‘hard crash’ – and to rescue both the pilot and the entire aircraft in the event of a flying emergency.

To deploy, the pilot must pull a lever that fires the parachute from the rear of the plane, allowing the plane to make a relatively soft landing. Only small aircraft have installed such Ballistic Recovery Systems because of their weight.

Advertisement

- Advertisement -

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.