Latest Breaking News & Hot Updates Around USA OR All Over World

Ben Fordham condemns terrorist court decision as accused ISIS member may go home to Australia

0 19

Ben Fordham has sued the Supreme Court over a ruling that paved the way for a dual citizen accused of fighting for the Islamic State in Syria to restore his Australian citizenship.

Fordham said on Thursday morning during his 2GB show that the case is Prime Minister Anthony Albanian’s first ‘big test’ in which dual-citizen Australians are likely to regain their citizenship after the court ruled that the powers used by the government to cancel them were unconstitutional.

Turkish-Australian Delil Alexander, 35, is in prison in Syria after his Australian citizenship was revoked on July 2 last year.

Australian intelligence said Alexander traveled to the country to join terror group ISIS before being arrested by Kurdish forces.

‘Have we gone mad? Anyone with ties to this terrorist group has no place in our country,” Fordham said on Thursday.

“Because (Alexander) has never been tried in Australia and has only committed terrorism abroad, we cannot deprive him of his citizenship.”

Ben Fordham has criticized the Supreme Court after it ordered that a dual citizen accused of fighting for Islamic State in Syria should be restored to his Australian citizenship.

Alexander’s lawyers argued that the Sydney-born man was at risk of “serious human rights abuses”, including torture, while he was imprisoned in Syria.

The Supreme Court ruling could pave the way for 20 other Australians convicted of terrorism abroad to regain their citizenship.

“Anyone with ties to terror groups has no right to live here, especially when they made the decision to leave Australia and fight for the enemy,” Fordham said.

“If traveling to Syria to join a radical terror group doesn’t negate your loyalty to Australia, then I don’t know what will.”

The government has other powers in its arsenal to keep double nationals accused of terrorism abroad, including a temporary exclusion order preventing them from coming to Australia for up to 10 years.

Fordham then spoke of the Islamic State terror attacks that have rocked Australia before, including the 2014 siege of Sydney’s Lindt Cafe and the 2018 Melbourne stabbing.

“(The government) must do everything it can to keep these freaks out of Australia and if the families want to say they weren’t radicalized properly, what were they doing in Syria? They weren’t on a Contiki tour.’

'Have we gone mad?  Anyone with ties to this terrorist group has no place in our country,

‘Have we gone mad? Anyone with ties to this terrorist group has no place in our country,” Fordham said on Thursday

Supreme Court ruling could pave the way for 20 other Australians convicted of terrorism abroad to regain their citizenship

Supreme Court ruling could pave the way for 20 other Australians convicted of terrorism abroad to regain their citizenship

A majority of the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the former coalition government’s powers to deprive it of citizenship were invalid.

The court ruled that it had given the former interior minister “the sole judicial function of attributing and punishing criminal guilt.”

Fordham said the Supreme Court decision was “outrageous” and put Australian lives at risk.

“The court has ruled in favor of a man who was involved in a group that planned to execute an innocent Aussie and cut off his head,” the 2GB host said.

‘Let me say that again. The Supreme Court backs the man, who is involved with Islamic State, part of a cell that wanted to execute and behead an innocent Australian.’

Alexander’s lawyers contacted Australian officials and demanded that they talk to their Syrian colleagues about returning the suspected terrorist to the country, to which Fordham replied, “I don’t think so.”

“The Australian Government has made the decision regarding the safety of all Australians. Anyone with ties to this terror group has no right to live here.

“These people made a choice, they got on a plane to Syria or Iraq, they made the decision to sign up with violent extremists.”

Australia's Supreme Court (pictured) found the laws giving the former Home Secretary the power to cancel dual citizenship as 'punitive' and unconstitutional

Australia’s Supreme Court (pictured) found the laws giving the former Home Secretary the power to cancel dual citizenship as ‘punitive’ and unconstitutional

In 2018, Labor criticized the change in law as likely unconstitutional.

Two judges found the laws to be “punitive in nature,” granting the minister the power “to suspend citizenship as a sanction for past conduct, similar to historical forms of punishment, with significant consequences for the individual,” said a judge. summary of the verdict.

However, it turned out that the part of the Citizenship Act that gave the minister the power was backed by the “foreigners power” of the constitution.

Four judges – Chief Justice Susan Kiefel, Patrick Keane, Jacqueline Gleeson and James Edelman – said part of the exemption granted to the plaintiff should be a statement that he is an Australian citizen.

Justice Simon Steward said in his judgment that the laws were valid because there were sufficient safeguards.

“(The section) was thus enacted, not as a punishment for a crime, but as a ‘political precaution,'” he wrote.

It is clear that Alexander and the other person will restore their citizenship, but the decision will not affect people detained ashore.

Turkish-Australian Delil Alexander, 35, was detained in Syria after his Australian citizenship was removed on July 2 last year when he was suspected of terrorist raids and recruitment (stock image from an Australian passport)

Turkish-Australian Delil Alexander, 35, was detained in Syria after his Australian citizenship was removed on July 2 last year when he was suspected of terrorist raids and recruitment (stock image from an Australian passport)

Attorney General Mark Dreyfus said in a statement that he and Home Secretary Clare O’Neil will investigate the verdict and its implications in detail.

But he noted that there was “no threat to Australia as a result of the decision.”

“The Australian government has a range of measures in place to manage the risks to Australians from offshore individuals, including the temporary exclusion order, which can ban a person from returning to Australia for up to two years,” he said.

Alexander left Australia for Turkey on April 16, 2013, but just over two weeks later, he got married in Syria.

ASIO ruled that he had joined the Islamic State terrorist group in August 2013, a qualified security assessment for which he has applied for judicial review.

In November 2017, he was arrested by Kurdish militias in a place in Syria that had not been declared an area under Australian terrorist laws.

Alexander was transferred to Syrian custody and given a five-year sentence for “unspecified crimes under the Syrian Criminal Code.”

He was pardoned last June after serving 18 months of his term.

Shortly after he was pardoned, ASIO’s director general gave secret advice to the then interior minister, who did not recommend revocation of citizenship, the court heard.

However, the minister Karen Andrews stripped Alexander of citizenship in July 2021.

Since then, he has been in Syrian intelligence custody and his family and lawyers have been unable to contact him, prompting his sister Berivan to start legal proceedings as a “trial keeper.”

State attorneys argued that the minister met the three required conditions in the decision: a person has engaged in the required conduct; the behavior shows that the person has rejected his allegiance to Australia; and it would be against the public interest for them to remain an Australian citizen.

Former Attorney General Christian Porter, when introducing the changes in 2018, argued that stripping Australian citizenship from those seeking to harm the nation was an “integral part of our ongoing response to international violent extremism and terrorism.”

Alexander’s lawyers argued that the power to revoke Australian citizen status is “inherently a domestic matter” and should be reserved to a judge.

The court heard that Alexander retains Turkish citizenship.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.