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British autumn will feel like summer with a 12 percent fall in precipitation by the end of the century

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British autumn will feel more like summer, with a 12 percent drop and temperatures rising by the end of the century

  • Rainfall during the English autumn will decrease by four to twelve percent by the end of the century
  • In contrast, storms will increase in intensity, but not diminish the impact of drought
  • Only three of the 14 areas in England are currently not affected by drought
  • Wessex and Bristol Water have both confirmed their stocks are secure this year
  • But warnings could face challenges if dry weather continues next year

Fall will become drier and hotter after 2025, making it feel more “summery” and increasing the risk of drought, the Met Office said.

Rainfall during the English autumn is expected to have decreased by four to 12 percent by the end of the century.

In contrast, the storms are predicted to increase in intensity, the Telegraph reported, although they will not mitigate the impact of the extended dry spells.

“One of the things we’re already seeing in the fall as average seasonal temperatures rise is an increase in extreme rainfall,” David Cotterill, who led the study, told the paper.

He added: “But in the future, we will probably also see this drying effect.”

The Southwest is now in drought after some of the driest conditions in nearly 90 years, the Environment Agency has said. Fall will get drier and hotter after 2025, making it feel more “summery” and increasing the risk of drought, the Met Office says

Britain's trees (horse chestnut trees in Cambridge pictured) turned a sea of ​​red and orange, as leaves crunched underfoot as weeks of extreme temperatures and drought triggered a 'false autumn' in yet another unexpected seasonal shift

Britain’s trees (horse chestnut trees in Cambridge pictured) turned a sea of ​​red and orange, as leaves crunched underfoot as weeks of extreme temperatures and drought triggered a ‘false autumn’ in yet another unexpected seasonal shift

And he continued: “To see how situations might unfold, we can consider the fall of 2020. On 3rd October we saw the UK’s wettest day on record and the amount of rain could have filled Loch Ness.

“But if you look at the total rainfall for that fall, it’s actually only six percent above average, and that’s because of a drier September and November of that year.”

The UK has also recently experienced a ‘false autumn’ due to the drought. An exceptionally hot and dry summer leads to the unexpected seasonal shift that has turned Britain’s trees into a sea of ​​red and orange a month early.

Yesterday, the Environment Agency officially moved the South West of England to drought status, leaving only three of England’s 14 areas currently experiencing no drought during what was the driest year since 1976.

But a ban on garden hoses still seems unlikely following the statement after Wessex and Bristol Water both confirmed their supplies are safe for this year.

Both firms added that resilience is at least in part a result of their actions in tackling leaks.

A wheat field near Cotswold Airport in Gloucestershire during England's driest July since 1935

A wheat field near Cotswold Airport in Gloucestershire during England’s driest July since 1935

The drought causes low river discharges and affects the environment in and around rivers

The drought causes low river discharges and affects the environment in and around rivers

“All summer we’ve been ‘filling up’ rivers and streams with 90 million liters of water a day that we can pump from groundwater sources,” a spokesman for Wessex Water told the Telegraph.

“We also fix 1,200 leaks every month and have reduced leakage by 30 percent over the past 20 years, which has contributed to a decline in demand despite a 12 percent increase in population.”

Though warnings have been issued by meteorologists that both companies are also expected to face challenges if dry weather continues next year.

“Despite the heavy rainfall of the past two weeks, it was not enough to fill our rivers and aquifers,” Chris Paul, the drought chief of the Environment Agency, told the paper.

‘The river levels in our Wessex area are exceptionally low – many with the lowest recorded flows.

“This puts incredible pressure on the local wildlife and that’s why we’re transitioning to drought status. We prioritize our local activities to minimize environmental impact.’

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