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Can Dumping the Furnace This Winter Help Lower Your Energy Bill? Chef reveals microwave is cheaper

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Cooking your food in a microwave can be one way to save on your energy bill, as the cost of living skyrockets in Britain’s colder months.

UK energy customers will have a tight few months to wait, if not longer, as price caps rise.

Ofgem confirmed on Friday that the price cap will rise by 80 percent – the average household’s annual bill will go from £1,971 to £3,549 from October 1, with further adjustments on December 31.

Research has suggested that it is much cheaper to cook essential foods in the microwave than traditionally in an oven.

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Microwave ally: uSwitch said it would cost you about 27p to cook a baked potato in the oven, but only 3p in the microwave (file image)

Broccoli in the microwave costs 1 pence instead of 6 pence on a stovetop and poaching an egg is a third of the price

Broccoli in the microwave costs 1 pence instead of 6 pence on a stovetop and poaching an egg is a third of the price

Broccoli in the microwave costs 1 pence instead of 6 pence on a stovetop and poaching an egg is a third of the price

Research by energy supplier Utilita found that using a microwave oven costs just £30 a year, while an electric stove costs £316 for the same period.

Meanwhile, uSwitch said it would cost you about 27 cents to cook a baked potato in the oven, but only 3 cents in the microwave.

Broccoli in the microwave costs 1 pence instead of 6 pence on a stovetop, and poaching an egg is a third of the price.

Even Michelin-starred chef Tom Brown has revealed that he sometimes chooses to use the microwave to cook certain dishes.

“There’s a lot of food that’s great when it’s microwaved,” Brown said The times.

No compromise on taste: Michelin-starred chef Tom Brown (pictured) has revealed that he sometimes chooses to use the microwave to cook certain dishes

No compromise on taste: Michelin-starred chef Tom Brown (pictured) has revealed that he sometimes chooses to use the microwave to cook certain dishes

“A steamed sponge cake works really well, so I think the snobbery is a bit old-fashioned.”

It came as people across the country were looking for hacks to ease pressure on the cost of living.

An engineer said he found the cheapest way to boil water, and it’s not the result you’d expect.

Taking into account the different prices of electricity and gas, TikTok user dinosaurdannyx said cooking on a stovetop is cheaper than the kettle.

The engineer said that although the hob uses more energy, gas is generally cheaper than the electricity used in a kettle.

Taking into account the different prices of electricity and gas, TikTok user dinosaurdannyx said cooking on a stovetop is cheaper than the kettle

Taking into account the different prices of electricity and gas, TikTok user dinosaurdannyx said cooking on a stovetop is cheaper than the kettle

The engineer said that although the hob uses more energy, gas is generally cheaper than the electricity used in a kettle

The engineer said that although the hob uses more energy, gas is generally cheaper than the electricity used in a kettle

Ofgem's price cap will rise from £1,971 now to £3,549 from October 2022, it was confirmed today.  And experts at energy consultancy Auxilione now think the cap will rise a further 52 percent to £5,405 in January 2023, then a further 34 percent to £7,263 in April - before falling slightly, falling 11 percent to £6,485 in July. and by a further 7 percent to £6,006 in October.

Ofgem’s price cap will rise from £1,971 now to £3,549 from October 2022, it was confirmed today. And experts at energy consultancy Auxilione now think the cap will rise a further 52 percent to £5,405 in January 2023, then a further 34 percent to £7,263 in April – before falling slightly, falling 11 percent to £6,485 in July. and by a further 7 percent to £6,006 in October.

Ofgem confirmed on Friday that the price cap will rise by 80 percent, taking the average household’s annual bill from £1,971 to £3,549 from October.

The cap announcement will go into effect for approximately 24 million homes in England, Scotland and Wales on standard energy rates on October 1 and will remain in effect until December 31, after which it will be adjusted again.

Britain’s 4.5 million prepayment meter customers, who are often the most vulnerable and already in fuel poverty, will see an even steeper rise – with an average annual bill set to rise to £3,608.

And next year it could get even worse, with experts from consulting firm Auxilione using the latest gas prices to predict the cap will rise another 52 percent to £5,405 in January 2023, then by another 34 percent to £7,263 in April – before falling slightly, by 11 percent to £6,485 in July and a further 7% to £6,006 in October.

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