COMMENTS DAILY MAIL: It’s time to find our sense of perspective

COMMENTS DAILY MAIL: It’s time to find our sense of perspective










If a week in politics is a long time, the past seven days must have seemed like an eternity for Boris Johnson. And a terribly painful one.

Attacked on all sides by the growing list of Downing Street rule-breaking get-togethers, he gave every impression of a man falling into one of Dante’s circles of hell.

To a large extent he is the architect of his own misfortune. It is now abundantly clear that he and his staff have openly and consistently violated the strict lockdown rules they themselves proclaimed.

The country is understandably outraged. Labor is in full hypocrisy and even among its own backbenchers are being called for his resignation.

But today this paper asks: is it really in the interest of this country – or even that of the Tory party – for him to leave?

COMMENTS DAILY POST: If a week in politics is a long time, the past seven days must have seemed like an eternity for Boris Johnson. And an unbearably painful one

We are not trying to minimize the pain caused by the ‘Partygate’ revelations. These functions should not have happened and Mr Johnson bears ultimate responsibility.

However, his apology on Wednesday was sincere and showed genuine remorse. So it’s now up to the Cabinet, Mandarin Sue Gray, to determine whether both laws and regulations have been broken.

If the early reports are correct, her investigation will disapprove of those who allowed the parties to proceed but did not recommend the police.

The big question then is whether the prime minister can rise from the ashes. His cabinet has rallied behind him in recent days, with the notable exception of Chancellor Rishi Sunak, whose ‘support’ has been suspiciously lukewarm.

Liz Truss, a potential leadership candidate, deserves credit for her display of loyalty yesterday, urging the country to accept her leader’s apology and “keep going.”

Moving on is, of course, the last thing Labor and the rest of Johnson’s enemies want.

They would rather see him stuck in Partygate indefinitely, even if it would be honorable to have him focus all his energies on running the country at this critical time.

Nearly bursting with piety, Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer accused the prime minister on Wednesday of lacking all “moral authority”. Yet it turns out that just days after the April 16 festivities in Downing Street, Sir Keir was sipping beer with a bunch of party members in an office in the northern constituency.

Funnily enough, he claims it was “a work meeting.” The defense he called “pathetic” when Mr. Johnson used it. What a shameless hypocrite!

COMMENTS FROM THE DAILY MAIL: But today this newspaper is asking whether it is really in the interest of this country - or even that of the Tory party - that he leave?

COMMENTS FROM THE DAILY MAIL: But today this newspaper is asking whether it is really in the interest of this country – or even the Tory party – that he leave?

The BBC is also obsessed with taking down the Prime Minister. The flagship Today program ran its bulletins on Partygate yesterday, while the shocking story of a prominent ex-Labor minister who was funded by a Chinese spy was relegated to a minor point. Impartiality – or naked bias?

When deciding on Johnson’s suitability to rule, voters and unruly Tory MPs should ignore the fuss and consider where Britain stands today, two years after the worst pandemic in modern history struck.

At a hugely important moment yesterday, we learned that the economy has risen above pre-Covid levels, while other European countries remain in the doldrums.

Omicron infections are falling in every region of the country, justifying Mr Johnson’s bold decision not to re-impose the lockdown despite enormous pressure from scientists and all opposition parties.

On most of the big decisions – vaccinations, jobs, protecting the economy and of course Brexit, which allowed us to create our own brilliant vaccine program while the EU hesitated – he was proved right.

Shouldn’t that be enough to convince voters, no matter how angry they may be, to give him a second chance?

Advertisement

.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.