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Critics Call JK Rowling’s New Novel ‘Unreadable’ As Excerpts Show Pages Are Full Of TWEETS

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JK Rowling’s new novel has been ridiculed online after a journalist revealed that some pages are full of fictional tweets.

The 57-year-old author released The Ink Black Heart on Tuesday under her pseudonym Robert Galbraith.

The novel tells the story of an illustrator who is haunted online for their views on transgender people, a topic very similar to the negative attention the Harry Potter author has received in recent years for her own views on the matter.

Inspired by her Twitter woes, Rowling filled part of her 1,200-page thriller with tweets, but critics labeled them “fantastic” and “illegible.”

The move was mocked by US-based editor Nathan J. Robinson, who shared several excerpts at: Twitter and wrote: ‘I realize that JK Rowling’s new novel may seem a bit long at 1,200 pages, but a lot of the space is taken up by fictional mean tweets.’

JK Rowling’s 57, released her latest novel, The Ink Black Heart, on Tuesday under her pseudonym Robert Galbraith, and has been mocked online after Current Affairs editor Nathan J. Robinson shared several snippets on Twitter.

Inspired by her Twitter woes, Rowling filled much of her 1,200-page new thriller with tweets, but critics labeled them

Inspired by her Twitter woes, Rowling filled much of her 1,200-page new thriller with tweets, but critics labeled them “fantastic” and “unreadable.”

He then shared several screenshots of the novel, revealing pages filled with tweets in their entirety and others containing only a small portion of the text, with six to seven tweets running to the bottom of the page.

The novel tells the story of an illustrator who is haunted online for their views on transgender people, a topic very similar to the negative attention the Harry Potter author has received in recent years for her own views on the matter.

The novel tells the story of an illustrator who is haunted online for their views on transgender people, a topic very similar to the negative attention the Harry Potter author has received in recent years for her own views on the matter.

Examples of the novel’s tweets were: “If God meant us to be sympathetic, why did he make crying people look so ugly?” and “Can someone tell that mean mercenary to take a nap. #stopfeedingFedwell #IstandwithJosh’

Readers have so far been unimpressed with the excerpts, some saying they were unoriginal and that Rowling’s writing career had taken a sad turn.

“It’s not the most important thing here, but that all these tweets feel like they were written by the same person is a damning indictment of her writing skills,” one said.

“I know it should be obvious too, since she’s written a book that nags about the trolls, but she really doesn’t consider people who disagree with her to have real beliefs or beliefs, does she? They’re just mean because they are,” they added.

“The tweet appeared while Strike was eating his chips, truly the greatest writer of our time,” one joked, referring to a line in the excerpts shared online.

‘Day. She was clearly one of the most imaginative authors of all time. The Harry Potter world is a creative genius, almost unparalleled in recorded history. This is a sad turn of events,” wrote another.

“I’m all for writing down your experiences, and guess what, even if this is just the same indulgent ‘they’re so mean’ crap she always does when she tries to play the victim for her bigotry. But even in terms of raw formatting and readability, this is…so painful. Unreadable,’ someone said.

Robinson shared the pages he had come across in the digital edition of the novel, mocking the fact that several tweets took up pages and pages of the apparently hefty book

Robinson shared the pages he had come across in the digital edition of the novel, mocking the fact that several tweets took up pages and pages of the apparently hefty book

Excerpts from the book reveal that Rowling was mimicking realistic exchanges you might encounter on Twitter as part of the intrigue in her new novel

Excerpts from the book reveal that Rowling was mimicking realistic exchanges you might encounter on Twitter as part of the intrigue in her new novel

Some came in defense of the author of Harry Potter, saying that The Black Ink Heart is like any other epistolary novel.

‘It seems to me to be a contemporary epistolary novel. I’m sure some 1897 readers were unhappy with ‘Dracula’, which consists of so many letters and diary entries,” they said.

Rowling has been repeatedly targeted by trolls after making critical comments about transgender people in recent years.

It comes just days after Rowling received death threats online from an extremist, as she warned that social media is “a gift to people who want to behave maliciously.”

Speaking to Graham Norton on his Virgin Radio show earlier this week, she said: ‘Social media can be a lot of fun and I love the pub argument aspect of it.

‘That can be fun to do. But there is no doubt that social media is a gift to those who want to behave maliciously.”

And on whether there’s anything that can be done to prevent online trolling, she added: “I guess on some level I’m not sure I can do it.

“I’m not sure if anyone can. I try to behave online the way I would like others to behave. I would never want… Of course I never threatened anyone, and I certainly wouldn’t want anyone to go to their houses or anything like that.’

Readers have so far been unimpressed with the excerpts, with some labeling them as 'illegible'

Readers have so far been unimpressed with the excerpts, with some labeling them as ‘illegible’

She added that she had reported the apparent threat from an Islamist extremist for her support for novelist Salman Rushdie on Twitter, before posting a screenshot of the response saying, “These are your guidelines, right? “Violence: you cannot threaten violence against an individual or a group of people. We also prohibit the glorification of violence… “Terrorism/violent extremism: you cannot threaten or promote terrorism”…’

In an apparent attempt to get Aziz to boot from Twitter, Rowling later posted, “@TwitterSupport any chance of some support?”.

Rowling has also spoken out about cancellation culture in the past amid claims she’s been “cancelled” by younger generations, but in a rare interview she said she “didn’t want to be a part of” The Return To Hogwarts reunion.

The author has often tweeted critically about the use of inclusive language and spaces, most memorable retweeting a post referring to “menstruating people” adding, “I’m sure there used to be a word for those people. Someone help me. wumben? Wimp? Woomud?’

Transgender activists say Ms Rowling’s views are discriminatory and fail to recognize the difficulties transgender and non-binary people face, but some feminists argue that it is vital to preserve same-sex spaces to protect vulnerable women.

Ms Rowling has also been criticized for claims she made in an effort to defend herself in 2020, including the claim that only people who are “privileged or lucky enough to never have been confronted with male violence” support inclusive spaces.

She said: “I stand with the brave women and men, gay, straight and trans, who stand up for freedom of speech and thought, and for the rights and safety of some of the most vulnerable in our society: young gay children, vulnerable teenagers and women who depend on and want to maintain their sex spaces.

Polls show that those women are in the vast majority, and only those who are privileged or lucky enough to have never experienced male violence or sexual assault, and who have never bothered to educate themselves about how often it occurs.’

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