David Attenborough, 95, impressed the crew of The Green Planet with his rowing skills during filming

David Attenborough proved that age was just a number when he impressed the crew of The Green Planet with his rowing skills during filming.

The 95-year-old environmentalist showed his stamina when he insisted on rowing himself back across a Croatian lake after shooting scenes for the show that airs Sunday.

David had the world heritage site of Falling lakes in Plitvice and after exploring the area and vegetation, the show bosses refused to let him row back.

Young at heart: David Attenborough proved that age was just a number when he impressed the crew of The Green Planet with his rowing skills during filming

Show producer Mike Gunton told The Mirror: “I was in the boat with him partly because I’m directing him, but also because he’s in the middle of the lake and I have to make sure nothing goes wrong.

“So I basically rowed to the location where we were filming, and then he took over.

“When we had the shots, I said, ‘Okay David, we’ve stopped now. I’ll get in and row us back.” He said, ‘Oh no, no, that’s fine.’ So we have kind of a competitive thing about who is the best rower.

Boat: The 95-year-old environmentalist showed his stamina when he insisted on rowing himself back across a Croatian lake after shooting scenes for the show that airs on Sunday

Boat: The 95-year-old environmentalist showed his stamina when he insisted on rowing himself back across a Croatian lake after shooting scenes for the show that airs on Sunday

“I was a rower when I was in college, so I think I’m pretty good. But he had none of it. He rowed us all the way back, about a third of a mile. I was impressed. That’s a heavy old boat.’

In other scenes that air, he is also filmed lifting a water lettuce to reveal its sprawling roots.

He also used an underwater camera while punting on the River Avon in Wiltshire.

Strong: David had visited the Falling Lakes World Heritage Site in Plitvice and after exploring the area and vegetation, he refused to let show bosses row him back

Strong: David had visited the Falling Lakes World Heritage Site in Plitvice and after exploring the area and vegetation, he refused to let show bosses row him back

Filmed using groundbreaking technology, the five-part series is split into five distinct plant worlds: tropical worlds, water worlds, seasonal worlds, desert worlds, and human worlds.

Covid travel restrictions meant the series, made by the world-renowned Natural History Unit at BBC Studios, was filmed over four years.

David believes that The Green Planet series is timely, especially with biodiversity declining faster than at any other time in human history.

A 2018 study found that human activity has been responsible for the loss of 83 percent of the world’s wild mammals and 50 percent of our plants.

Interesting: Filmed using groundbreaking technology, the five-part series is split into five different worlds that plants inhabit: tropical worlds, water worlds, seasonal worlds, desert worlds, and human worlds

Interesting: Filmed using groundbreaking technology, the five-part series is split into five different worlds that plants inhabit: tropical worlds, water worlds, seasonal worlds, desert worlds, and human worlds

‘The world has become plant-conscious. There has been a global revolution in attitudes towards the natural world,” he said earlier.

‘Without plants we would starve, without plants we wouldn’t be able to breathe. The world is green, but people’s understanding of plants, albeit in a limited way, has not kept up with that.

“This will bring it home. It’s a cliché now, but every bite of air we take, and every bite of food we eat, depends on plants.’

He says one of his favorite moments was filming giant redwoods in California for the Seasonal Worlds episode.

They’ve been there for 3,000 years, but this was the team’s first time filming them.

“One of the really amazing, deeply moving experiences was going up to these huge trees,” says David.

“But what this program did was take advantage of technical inventions that have changed natural history photography over the past twenty years: drones.

“The camera suddenly rises above the treetops and you see those giants – it’s a really beautiful sequence.”

The Green Planet, Sunday, 7pm, BBC1.

Important: David has previously said he believes The Green Planet series is timely, especially with biodiversity declining faster than at any other time in human history

Important: David has previously said he believes The Green Planet series is timely, especially with biodiversity declining faster than at any other time in human history

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