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Death of Queen Elizabeth II: Flags fly at half-mast over Australia to mark Queen’s death

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Flags across the country will be flown at half-mast to mark the death of Queen Elizabeth II at the age of 96.

News of Her Majesty’s death on Friday has left millions in mourning, as tributes pour in in memory of the world’s longest-reigning monarch in seven decades.

Flags over Australia will be flown half-mask over iconic landmarks including Sydney Harbor Bridge and Parliament House, Canberra.

The world is in mourning after the shock of Queen Elizabeth II’s death, with Australians flocking to sign condolences and flags flying at half-mast

Australian and Indigenous flags on Sydney Harbor Bridge were flown at half-mast on Friday

Australian and Indigenous flags on Sydney Harbor Bridge were flown at half-mast on Friday

Workers in the rain outside the parliament building in Canberra, flying flags at half-mast

Workers in the rain outside the parliament building in Canberra, flying flags at half-mast

Australian flags at Parliament House in Canberra fly at half-mast as nation mourns Queen's passing

Australian flags at Parliament House in Canberra fly at half-mast as nation mourns Queen’s passing

Workers were caught in the rain when they flew several flags at half-mast in front of Parliament House in Canberra.

Special tributes were paid at Sydney’s St Andrews Cathedral in Sydney, where the Australian flag was also lowered.

One could see the public paying their respects and placing flowers and pictures of the Queen in front of the front doors of the building.

St Andrew's Cathedral in Sydney marked the Queen's passing with flags at half-mast and people paying floral tribute

St Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney marked the Queen’s passing with flags at half-mast and people paying floral tribute

Members of the public arrived at St Andrew's Cathedral, Sydney to pay their respects

Members of the public arrived at St Andrew’s Cathedral, Sydney to pay their respects

A man posts a photo of the Queen in front of flowers left outside St Andrew's Cathedral

A man posts a photo of the Queen in front of flowers left outside St Andrew’s Cathedral

A book of condolence opened in St Andrew's Cathedral for people to leave messages for the Queen

A book of condolence opened in St Andrew’s Cathedral for people to leave messages for the Queen

A visiting school class observed a portrait of Her Majesty the Queen in the Parliament building in Canberra on Friday

A visiting school class observed a portrait of Her Majesty the Queen in the Parliament building in Canberra on Friday

There was also a condolence book available in the cathedral where people could leave special messages.

A visiting school class observed a portrait of Her Majesty the Queen in the parliament building in Canberra on Friday.

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese paid a moving tribute to the Queen, citing her many achievements and incredible strength of character during her 70-year reign.

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese paid a moving tribute to the Queen, noting her many achievements and incredible strength of character during her 70-year reign

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese paid a moving tribute to the Queen, noting her many achievements and incredible strength of character during her 70-year reign

With the death of Queen Elizabeth II, an historic reign and a long life devoted to duty, family, faith and service has come to an end.

“The Government and people of Australia offer our deepest condolences to the Royal Family as they mourn a beloved mother, grandmother and great-grandmother – the person who has been their greatest inner strength for so long.

“Australian hearts go out to the people of the UK who are grieving today, knowing they will feel they have lost part of what makes their nation whole.

“There is comfort in Her Majesty’s own words: ‘Sorrow is the price we pay for love’.

“This is a loss we all feel, as few have known a world without Queen Elizabeth II. In her seven remarkable decades on the throne, Her Majesty has been a rare and reassuring constant amid rapid changes,” he said.

The Queen's place in the hearts of millions of Australians was as enduring as her lifelong relationship with the former colony. She is pictured receiving flowers from waiting schoolchildren waving flags after a Commonwealth Day Service in Sydney in March 2006

The Queen’s place in the hearts of millions of Australians was as enduring as her lifelong relationship with the former colony. She is pictured receiving flowers from waiting schoolchildren waving flags after a Commonwealth Day Service in Sydney in March 2006

Mr Albanese said Her Majesty was a source of strength for many Australians, a unique constant no matter the circumstances.

“Queen Elizabeth II has been a wise and encouraging guide, always wanting the best for our nation and greeting every change with understanding, good grace and an abiding faith in the judgment of the Australian people.

All in all, she was a monarch who showed her humanity and did her duty with fidelity, integrity and humor.

“In this she was supported for so long and so lovingly by the late Prince Philip, her ‘strength and stay’ for 73 years.”

A proclamation ceremony will be held at Parliament House in Canberra over the weekend. The event is open to the public subject to then-current public health restrictions.

The governor-general will read the proclamation in the forecourt of the parliament building, followed by a 21-gun salute.

The salute takes place at dusk and consists of one round for each year of the queen’s life at 10-second intervals.

The Queen visited Australia in 1954, 1963, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2006 and 2011 - her last time on these coasts. She is pictured in 1981

The Queen visited Australia in 1954, 1963, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2006 and 2011 – her last time on these coasts. She is pictured in 1981

There will be no official mourning period across the country. Instead, Australia will introduce a 14-day observance that suspends parliament.

The Australian national flag must be flown at half-mast until after the day of burial in the UK. Instructions will be given to raise the flag for the proclamation.

Condolence books will be available at Parliament House and Government House in Canberra.

Condolence registers will also be opened at government offices in each state. An online condolence form will also be posted on the websites of the Governor General and the Ministry of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

In Canberra, flower arrangements can be left in the forecourt of Parliament House and Government House.

Each state and territory will make local arrangements for floral arrangements.

The Royal Family has noted that instead of paying floral tributes, Australians might consider making a donation to a charity of their choice.

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