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Food stock owner says it’s not ‘greedy’ to take advantage of discounts at Woolworths and Coles

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Desperate families hoard discounted groceries as inflation mounts and meat and vegetable prices go through the roof — with one mom admitting she’s proud of her husband’s effort to pile up their “doomsday” pantry.

The budget-conscious moms and dads have put huge errands online and show off their impressive pantry, laundry and freezer cabinets — and many agreed that drastic action is needed to stock up.

‘I am proud of my husband. He does such an amazing job with our doomsday pantry. Well, it’s really just a money-saving pantry,’ said one of the proud mothers.

Families show off their ‘doomsday’ pantries as they begin to stress about rising inflation and the cost of living

Some admit buying piles of meat at a discount to save money at the checkout

While others stock up on cleaning supplies every time they are discounted

Some admit to buying piles of meat at a discount to save money at the register, while others stock up on cleaning supplies every time they are discounted

“We have so much stock now that we will definitely be good in the coming months. Almost everything was bought on special. I’m so lucky to have such a frugal family,” she boasted.

opinion poll

Have you started stockpiling items?

  • Starting? I always have! 0 votes
  • Yes, we must. 0 votes
  • No, that’s greedy. 0 votes

These posts typically provoke condemnations and calls to outlaw grocery hoarding, but it seems most people have finally gathered on the same page.

“This is great, well done. I thought I had a good reserve, but I only have food for a few weeks,” said one woman.

A self-titled “professional stock trader” has spoken out publicly against the few critics who accuse frugal families of buying large quantities.

Wendy Gower, who My Abundant Life blog and Faceook page told News critics should watch their tongues and avoid labeling hoarders as greedy or selfish for making good deals.

“They are wise to take care of their families and budget,” said the mother of two.

Ms Gower became frugal after living under the government’s low-income threshold for years, she explained.

And the lessons served her well when she finally made a good living as she could pay off her mortgage and a new car in just five years.

“We keep our grocery bill low by keeping a healthy stock, cooking all meals from scratch, baking cookies, muffins, cakes and other goodies, baking our own bread, growing some fruits and vegetables in our backyard, food, ingredients to buy, generic brands and looking for. Our meals are tasty, simple and filling,” she explains.

And others agreed — with a woman revealing laundry and bathroom essentials being her top priority.

She shared a photo of her broom closet showing an ample supply of dishwashing liquid, deodorant and other cleaning supplies.

“If the product I like is on a good special, I buy as many as I can, sometimes enough for a year,” she said.

Many people wanted a calculated approach to their hoarding, while others were purely opportunistic.

“My husband saw all this meat in the sale fridge, the depreciation was insane, so I told him to get it,” revealed a mm.

But this triggered some people.

“Hoarden is fine in the current climate, but it’s a good way to leave some for others, never clearing the shelf unless there are only one or two left when you get there,” said one woman.

“Yeah, someone might really need those $1 chicken wings to help their family get through the week — leave some for them too,” one man added.

This collector was impressed with their meat department after collecting all of this for under $30

This collector was impressed with their meat department after collecting all of this for under $30

Others showed off impressive piles of meat - before being reminded of it, it's good ways to leave some on the shelf in tough times

Others showed off impressive piles of meat – before being reminded of it, it’s good ways to leave some on the shelf in tough times

Panic buying became the ‘new normal’ during the Covid 19 pandemic, when supermarkets around the world were stripped of basic necessities such as toilet paper and canned food.

Every time there is a spike in cases or threats of strict lock-downs, supermarkets are forced to impose strict limits on their customers.

While a core segment of the population was shouting hoarders to make life harder for everyone else.

But now, with inflation soaring, people believe they have no choice but to cut spending where they can.

Some families revealed they have enough food to 'last a few months' should something happen to their income

Some families revealed they have enough food to ‘last a few months’ should something happen to their income

“If I use something and it’s offered at a discount, I get it. I can’t afford to feed my family well otherwise,” said one woman.

This is because the prices of fresh produce have skyrocketed, causing waves of hysteria across the community.

Even those with high paying jobs have felt the bottleneck.

On Thursday, an immigration attorney’s TikTok went viral when she realized snow peas would cost her $42.80 a kilo — despite being in season and typically retailing for $6 a kilo.

The snow pea shock is the latest in a series of price hikes for produce impacting lettuce, broccoli, cucumbers, Asian vegetables and bell peppers.

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