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GP stresses toll of loneliness on mental health of the elderly

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A GP has urged people to visit elderly relatives, neighbors and friends after a Coronation Street storyline highlighted the risk of suicide and mental health problems.

A scene in last night’s episode showed Audrey Roberts (Sue Nicholls) telling Gail Rodwell (Helen Worth) that she had attempted suicide or, as she put it, tried to “checkout.”

Speaking of Lorraine, Dr. Amir Khan said the plot highlighted an underreported problem of poor mental health among the elderly.

“As people get older, things change for them,” he said. “They are plagued by illnesses that can cause pain that prevent them from leaving the house… often relatives have moved far away so they can’t see them.”

dr. Amir said loneliness plays a big part in the toiling faced by the elderly.

The heartbreaking storyline of Audrey Roberts (Sue Nicholls) in Coronation Street highlighted the importance of taking care of the mental health of the elderly, a GP said.

Referring to the episode, Dr. Khan: ‘We are used to her in Coronation Street, she is an icon. We are used to her being talkative and sociable… but as she gets older she becomes more isolated.

“And for some, as they get older, their partners and friends may also die, so that adds to the loneliness.” All of this can have consequences for their mental health.’

dr. Amir revealed that he often sees elderly patients plagued by the burden of aging.

“I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve seen older people here in my clinic and they say to me, ‘Don’t get old Doctor Amir, it’s just not worth it.'”

He advised: ‘If you know someone who is elderly or isolated, now is a very good time to call them, or just text them…as the cost of living affects us all…important to talk about now. to talk.’

Speaking of Lorraine, Dr.  Amir Khan said the plot, in which Sue Nicholls' character admitted to attempting suicide, demonstrates the less-discussed struggles that come with aging

Speaking of Lorraine, Dr. Amir Khan said the plot, in which Sue Nicholls’ character admitted to attempting suicide, demonstrates the less-discussed struggles that come with aging

Referring to the episode, where the matriarch makes her confession to Gail Rodwell (Helen Worth), Dr. Amir shared how her life has changed as she got older.

Referring to the episode, where the matriarch makes her confession to Gail Rodwell (Helen Worth), Dr. Amir shared how her life has changed as she got older.

Viewers saw Audrey being treated in hospital in July and told a doctor she had accidentally taken too many tablets and later insisted this was the case with her own GP.

In emotional scenes last month, Audrey confided Roy Cropper (David Neilson), Rita Sullivan (Barbara Knox), Claudia Colby (Rula Lenska), and Ken Barlow (William Roache) that the overdose was, in fact, a suicide attempt.

Actress Sue Nicholls said of the storyline: “Audrey deeply regrets what she did and her first reaction was definitely to keep it for her family. Family means, and always will, mean so much to her, despite the occasional sniping.

She also enjoys and is grateful to be independent and happily living in her own home, although the only major regret that contributed to this last situation is the wish that dear Alfie (Bryan Mosley) was still alive and with her, so that they could have grown old and equally fickle together.

“Her family, who are busy with their own lives, see her down and sad moments because she is unable to deal with the real world and she feels that they have started treating her a bit like a child and she started to feel depressed.

He advised,

He advised, “If you know someone who is older or isolated, now is a really good time to give them a call, or just text them…”

“She’s usually very healthy and together, but her depression seemed to be taking over completely.

“Once she was able to talk to her friends and they opened up about their struggles, she realized how much they had helped her immensely regarding her problems.

Dr. Gaddas (Christine Mackie) prescribed her antidepressants, but again her stubbornness kicks in and she doesn’t take them.

“Fortunately, they talk to her old friends and persuade her to take the doctor’s advice and she sincerely thanks them for making life easier in every way.

“Now that’s the message I want people to get from this storyline, the importance of being able to talk to people you trust about how you’re feeling.

“Sometimes the younger generation thinks that someone over 70 is incapable of making decisions, which can cause the elderly to lose purpose and feel quite useless.

“I’m lucky enough to work with people of all ages. I have no idea how old many of them are and I don’t need to know. I enjoy talking to them and taking into account what they say about issues we discuss, regardless of our age.

Sue added that she hopes this storyline will help older people in need reach out and ask for help.

She said, “So I’d like to say, ‘Listen Audrey, I’m still learning about life at age 79 and I really hope to keep going.”

“I really hope this storyline helps older people reach out and talk about how they’re feeling and that younger people are aware of how much the older generation still has to offer.”

This storyline coincides with the latest campaign from ITV’s mental health initiative, Britain Get Talking.

Britain Get Talking wants to encourage all of us to take action to proactively take care of our mental health by connecting with others, with a current focus on youth anxiety.

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