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Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe condemns the NRL for suspending Caitlin Moran over a message about the Queen

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Outspoken Greens senator Lidia Thorpe has flown to the defense of native NRLW star Caitlin Moran and has criticized the competition after suspending her for calling Queen Elizabeth a “stupid dog” on the day of her death.

Thorpe, also an Indigenous woman, has been a fierce critic of the monarchy since she was elected to the Senate in the last federal election and she has now accused the NRL of failing to “create a safe workplace for First Nations players” after the penalty was handed down.

Moran, who currently plays for the Knights, sent shockwaves through the footy world after her deplorable social media post on the day of the Queen’s death at the age of 96.

In a since-deleted Instagram post, Moran wrote: “Good day today, Uncle Luke (Country Singer Luke Coombs) is announcing his tour and this stupid dog (Queen Elizabeth) is dying. Happy damn Friday.”

Knights star Caitlin Moran has become the first NRLW player to be suspended for an off-field incident following an insensitive message about the Queen on the day of her death

Moran was suspended for one game and given a suspended fine of 25 percent of her wages.

She will also have to undergo education and training on the correct use of social media.

The Knights half is the first female player to be banned in NRLW history due to an off-field issue.

Thorpe was outraged by the decision, tweeting: “I call on the NRL to do their own racism awareness training. If anyone needs training, it’s you.’

Lidia Thorpe lashed out at the NRL for suspending Caitlin Moran after calling the Queen a 'dumb dog' in a social media post on the day of the monarch's death

Lidia Thorpe lashed out at the NRL for suspending Caitlin Moran after calling the Queen a ‘dumb dog’ in a social media post on the day of the monarch’s death

Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe makes a black power salute during her swearing-in ceremony at the parliament building on Aug.

Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe makes a black power salute during her swearing-in ceremony at the parliament building on Aug.

Thorpe’s comments about the NRL came just days after she wrote, “I have seen anger and disbelief from First Nations people at the glorification of our oppressor (Queen Elizabeth).”

She also wrote, “I have seen our political leaders continue the oppressive narrative that First People continue to oppress in this country. They have shown no respect for us.’

Thorpe’s views were supported by high-profile Native rapper Adam Briggs, who accused the league, and jock Ray Hadley, of double standards.

In the wake of the scandal, Hadley said Moran’s comments were “perhaps the most reprehensible thing I’ve ever seen related to rugby league,” on his 2GB show.

That view was not shared by Briggs, who pointed out that former NRL legend Brett Finch pleaded guilty several weeks ago to using a carriage service to share child abuse material.

Native rapper Adam Briggs denounced the double standards of those who criticized Moran's slur against the Queen

Native rapper Adam Briggs denounced the double standards of those who criticized Moran’s slur against the Queen

Native rapper Adam Briggs (right, who describes himself as Senator Briggs) has also condemned the NRL's treatment of Moran.

Native rapper Adam Briggs (right, who describes himself as Senator Briggs) has also condemned the NRL’s treatment of Moran.

“It’s not even in the top 50 NRL standards,” Briggs wrote.

 

It was a view shared by many, who also pointed out that Panthers star Taylan May had been found guilty of assault but that his suspension was postponed to 2023 because, as the NRL said, they didn’t want to punish fans during the final. .

Others pointed out that former Newtown player Chris Dawson was also recently found guilty of murdering his wife.

Regardless, the NRL said the comments were unacceptable regardless of the circumstances.

“Rugby league is an inclusive game and has a proud and strong relationship with many communities,” the league said in a statement.

“Regardless of personal views, all players and officials must adhere to the professional standards expected of them and on this occasion the player’s public comments have caused damage to the game.”

Queen Elizabeth II died on Friday, September 8 at the age of 96 after more than 70 years of service to the UK and Commonwealth

Queen Elizabeth II died on Friday, September 8 at the age of 96 after more than 70 years of service to the UK and Commonwealth

moran has represented Australia, NSW and the native All Stars, and will not play for the Knights this weekend when they face the Dragons in the final round of the regular season.

She has until next Tuesday to decide whether to accept the ban.

Her coach Ronald Griffiths, who is also native, flew to defend his star halfback in the wake of the media spotlight.

“I wasn’t worried (about Moran’s comments). The relationship between the indigenous people and the monarchy is complicated,” said the Gommeroi man.

Caitlin Moran (second from left) with ex-NRL legend and champion boxer Anthony Mundine (right). Both footy stars are native

Caitlin Moran (second from left) with ex-NRL legend and champion boxer Anthony Mundine (right). Both footy stars are native

Moran has been fined and suspended by the NRLW for her insensitive social media post about the Queen on the day of her death

Moran has been fined and suspended by the NRLW for her insensitive social media post about the Queen on the day of her death

Aboriginal Tent Embassy Ambassador Gwenda Stanley went one step further and said the Queen’s death should be a happy time, not a time of sorrow.

“If anything, it (the Queen’s death) is something to be happy about for many colonies around the world. Although she has had many visits to Australia, there is still the injustice of the genocides she goes to her grave with,” said Stanley.

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