How a lost renaissance painting worth $25MILLION could hang on the wall of a Melbourne home

How a lost renaissance painting worth $25MILLION could hang on the wall of a Melbourne home

  • paolo Veronese’s The Pool of Bethesda painting worth a whopping $25 million
  • Thought the missing painting might hang on the wall of the mysterious Melbourne house
  • Last seen in 1877, depicting the Renaissance painting believed to depict healing










A lost Renaissance painting now valued at a staggering $25 million could be perched comfortably on the wall of a Melbourne suburban home, according to expert art researchers.

Paolo Veronese’s The Pool of Bethesda – once owned by the Russian Empress Catherine the Great – has not been seen in public since an art lover Robert Black tried to sell the masterpiece in the Melbourne Athenaeum as early as 1877.

At the time in Melbourne there were numerous scammers circulating in art circles, so the trustees of the National Gallery of Victoria cast serious doubt on Mr Black’s claim.

Paolo Veronese’s The Pool of Bethesda (pictured) is valued at $25 million – and could take pride of place on the wall in a Melbourne suburban home. It hasn’t been seen in public since 1877

Professor Emeritus Jaynie Anderson of the University of Melbourne and fellow art detective, Professor Emeritus Roderick Home — recently unearthed the minutes of a meeting of trustees held on Sept. 9, 1877, The Australian reports.

The trustees present at the meeting stated that they were “unwilling to consider the matter of purchasing this painting without satisfactory proof of its authenticity and value, as an example of the Great Master.”

Professor Anderson is hopeful that the elusive Renaissance painting can eventually be found and exhibited at the National Gallery of Victoria.

Measuring 3.35mx 1.9m, it is larger than most traditional paintings.

Emeritus Professor Jaynie Anderson (pictured) of the University of Melbourne believes that due to the painting's large size, it is unlikely to collect dust in an attic

Emeritus Professor Jaynie Anderson (pictured) of the University of Melbourne believes that due to the painting’s large size, it is unlikely to collect dust in an attic

“I mean, if a painting is small and someone doesn’t like it – say they inherited it or something – then they cram it in the attic or in a closet or something, but this is huge,” said art historian and curator Prof. Anderson.

The renowned artist Veronese was famous for his creations, which for centuries provided the inspiration for later large-scale ceiling and wall paintings in Venice, Italy and in other parts of the world.

The multi-million dollar painting is said to represent healing.

Advertisement

- Advertisement -

.