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Huge tooth of extinct megalodon shark discovered 10,000 feet below Pacific Ocean

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Huge tooth likely from extinct megalodon shark — which had a jaw big enough to eat a killer whale — is discovered 10,000 feet below the Pacific Ocean in a protected area

  • A large tooth likely belonging to a megalodon shark was found by explorers 10,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean
  • It took place as part of an Ocean Exploration Trust expedition to the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, which covers 495K square miles
  • The giant megalodon shark is believed to have measured up to 65 feet in length with teeth that measured 7 inches in length – often the size of an adult’s hand
  • The shark’s jaws were lined with 276 teeth and it is believed to have fed on whales, large fish and other sharks

Researchers have discovered a fossilized tooth the size of a human hand 10,000 feet below the Pacific Ocean that they believe belonged to a megalodon shark.

The maritime explorers who found it are conducting further tests to confirm their belief that the tooth belonged to the fearsome shark that roamed the Earth millions of years ago.

In addition to being the largest shark in the world, it was also one of the largest fish that ever existed. The word megalodon itself means ‘big tooth’.

The find came as part of an Ocean Exploration Trust expedition to the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, an area spanning 495,000 square miles in the mid-Pacific Ocean.

A large tooth likely belonging to a megalodon shark was found by explorers 10,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean

In addition to being the largest shark in the world, it was also one of the largest fish that ever existed.  The word megalodon itself means 'big tooth'

In addition to being the largest shark in the world, it was also one of the largest fish that ever existed. The word megalodon itself means ‘big tooth’

“Great find alarm!” researchers wrote on the trust’s Facebook page to announce the find Wednesday.

“While examining nodule samples for our Pacific Islands Johnston Atoll Expedition: US Fish and Wildlife Service, researchers discovered this huge shark tooth!”

“We think it belonged to the infamous extinct megalodon, but time (and further lab analysis) will tell!”

The giant megalodon shark, which inspired the 2018 film “The Meg,” is said to have been up to 65 feet long with teeth that measured 7 inches long — often the size of an adult’s hand.

“Great find alarm!” researchers wrote on the trust’s Facebook page to announce the find Wednesday. “While examining nodule samples for our Pacific Islands Johnston Atoll Expedition: US Fish and Wildlife Service, researchers discovered this huge shark tooth!”

Jack Cooper, a paleobiology researcher at Swansea University in the UK, told Newsweek that the giant sharks probably had to eat as many as 98,000 calories a day to maintain their size.

Jack Cooper, a paleobiology researcher at Swansea University in the UK, told Newsweek that the giant sharks probably had to eat as many as 98,000 calories a day to maintain their size.

The earliest fossils found of the sea creature date back to 20 million years ago.

The shark’s jaws were lined with 276 teeth and it is thought to have fed on whales, large fish and other sharks.

Jack Cooper, a researcher in paleobiology at Swansea University in the UK, said: News week that the giant sharks probably had to eat as many as 98,000 calories a day to maintain their size.

Scientists have estimated that its jaw was 9 feet by 11 feet wide, which is big enough to swallow two adults at once.

“The tooth looks very much like a megalodon tooth to me based on its size and serrations alone,” Cooper said.

“To my knowledge, this is the first tooth found in this area — or at least the first to be publicly documented. If true, then this extends the reach of megalodon even further than originally thought.’

Megalodon fossils have been found in distant parts of the world, but more sightings have been made near North and South Carolina, Baja California, Maryland and Peru, according to researchers.

‘What’s particularly interesting to me about this location is how remote and far out in the ocean it is, compared to the common coastal habitats in which megalodon teeth are found. This suggests to me that the shark may have migrated across the ocean when it lost that tooth,” Cooper said.

Megalodon fossils have been found in distant parts of the world, but there are more sightings near North and South Carolina, Baja California, Maryland and Peru, researchers say

Megalodon fossils have been found in distant parts of the world, but there are more sightings near North and South Carolina, Baja California, Maryland and Peru, according to researchers.

MEGALODON EXPLAINED

Pictured: Megalodon

Pictured: Megalodon

The megalodon, which means large tooth, lived between 23 and 3.6 million years ago.

O. megalodon is considered one of the largest and most powerful predators in vertebrate history, and fossil remains suggest it grew up to 65 feet in length.

The monster was thought to look like a beefier version of today’s dreaded great white shark and weighed up to 100 tons.

Megalodon is recognizable by its huge vertebrae and teeth, which are triangular and have a diagonal length of almost eight inches.

It took famed fossil hunter Vito ‘Megalodon’ Bertucci nearly 20 years to reconstruct the jaw of a megalodon — the largest ever assembled — measuring 10 feet (3 meters) wide and nearly 3 feet (3 feet) high.

The Megalodon’s colossal mouth is said to have spawned a brute force of 10.8 to 18.2 tons.

The ancient shark has been described as a super predator, as it could swim at high speeds and kill a wide variety of prey, such as sea turtles and whales, quickly in its strong jaws.

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