In the accessible Canberra house designed by blinking

A unique house built on the site of a catastrophic inferno was designed by the owner from his hospital bed.

When John and Karyn Mason’s home was razed to the ground during the Canberra bushfires in 2003, they believed they had experienced the darkest days of their lives.

But as the fire raged, John was hospitalized with Guillain-Barre syndrome, a rare and crippling nerve condition that left him paralyzed, unable to speak and clinging to life in the intensive care unit.

Determined that her husband would make it, Karyn set about designing a house that would meet their new needs, while John did his part by using his eyes to communicate with the architect and interior designer.

This unique house built on the site of a catastrophic inferno was designed by the owner from his hospital bed

John Mason helped his wife Karyn design their new home by blinking 'yes' once and 'no' twice after being paralyzed by a rare nerve condition

John Mason helped his wife Karyn design their new home by blinking ‘yes’ once and ‘no’ twice after being paralyzed by a rare nerve condition

After eight weeks in intensive care, John started blinking once for ‘yes’ and twice for ‘no’ to tell his wife and team what he wanted from their new home.

The result was a spectacular 380sqm home, complete with four bedrooms, three bathrooms, expansive open-plan living areas and a sparkling outdoor swimming pool sunk into the ground.

The house has been designed in accordance with accessibility standards and features wide hallways, wheelchair access facilities and a specialist kitchen with a low bench, sink and built-in coffee maker.

The kitchen and family room exude a great sense of space with 2.7m high sloping ceilings and inviting pool views, while the rumpus room has a bar and patio doors leading to the tiled entertainment area.

After eight weeks in ICU, John used his eyes to tell his wife and team what he wanted from their new home

After eight weeks in ICU, John used his eyes to tell his wife and team what he wanted from their new home

The result was a spectacular 380 m² home, complete with an accessible kitchen (photo) and a built-in coffee machine

The result was a spectacular 380 m² home, complete with an accessible kitchen (photo) and a built-in coffee machine

The house has four bedrooms and three bathrooms

As well as expansive open-plan living areas

The house has four bedrooms, three bathrooms and expansive open-plan living areas

There is also a sparkling outdoor pool sunk into the ground

There is also a sparkling outdoor pool sunk into the ground

Mr Warren said the couple would be sad to leave the custom home, which had met their needs, but it was time to downsize as they retired.

The design was awarded the 2005 Masters Builders Association Home of the Year award, a nod to the extraordinary story of resilience.

“From John blinking and unable to speak to creating an award-winning home, it’s truly remarkable,” estate agent Jonny Warren told Daily Mail Australia.

The one-off home sold under the hammer on Oct. 5 for $3.1 million (AUD), three times the average for similar-sized homes in the area.

Australian property prices are rising at the fastest pace since the late 1980s, with detached houses with gardens in particularly high demand, meaning numbers on the market have plummeted.

The house is designed according to accessible standards

The house is designed according to accessible standards

The master bedroom (photo) overlooks the garden

The other three (one pictured) are tucked away on the other side of the house

The master bedroom (left) overlooks the garden, while the other three (one on the right) are tucked away on the other side of the house

The kitchen has special features including a lowered bench (shown) and sink

The kitchen has special features including a lowered bench (shown) and sink

The one-off design was awarded the 2005 Masters Builders Association Home of the Year award, a nod to the extraordinary story of resilience

The one-off design was awarded the 2005 Masters Builders Association Home of the Year award, a nod to the extraordinary story of resilience

Across Australia there was a price increase of 18.4 a year, the strongest since July 1989, when interest rates stood at a now unimaginable 17 percent.

Sydney’s Northern Beaches saw a 33.8 percent annual increase in property prices, with the Richmond-Tweed area of ​​northern New South Wales – including Byron Bay – climbing 29.5 percent, marking the larger 26 percent increase surpassed in Sydney.

Record-low interest rates set home price records in 88 percent of Australian property markets, with coastal regional areas outperforming capital cities as more professionals started working from home, eliminating the need to live in major cities. live.

In August, house prices hit new peaks in 69 of Australia’s 78 real estate submarkets, based on a grouping of suburbs and cities.

The house (pictured) sold under the hammer on Oct. 5 for $3.1 million (AUD), three times the average for similar-sized homes in the area.

The house (pictured) sold under the hammer on Oct. 5 for $3.1 million (AUD), three times the average for similar-sized homes in the area.

The sale comes as Australian property prices continue to rise at their fastest pace since the late 1980s, with detached houses with gardens particularly in demand

The sale comes as Australian property prices continue to rise at their fastest pace since the late 1980s, with detached houses with gardens particularly in demand

A survey by home price data provider CoreLogic found that in August 2018 there were 153,803 homes for sale across Australia. At the end of August 2021, there were only 88,872 homes on the market, a drop of more than 42 percent.

But financial experts warn that prices in suburban areas could fall by 20 percent, while apartment values ​​could drop by as much as a third when the boom inevitably ends.

Aussie Home Loans founder John Symond said he fears prices have risen “too far, too fast” and called them “insane.”

A 20 percent drop in some suburbs would plunge Sydney’s average home price by $258,690, from an all-time high of $1,293 million, while a similar catastrophe in Melbourne would drop prices by $190,900, from $954,496.

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