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Indian mountaineer banned from Everest six years ago for ‘faking’ climb really climbs it

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An Indian climber banned from Mount Everest for allegedly Photoshopping photos of him at the top has actually climbed the world’s tallest mountain, but insists this is his second visit.

Narender Singh Yadav and Seema Rani Goswami said they climbed Mount Everest in 2016 with certification from the tourism department, but authorities deprived him of the award and banned him from Nepal.

He reached the top of the world’s highest mountain early on May 27, just six days after the end of his ban, which banned him from entering the country for two years.

This time, whether it was his first or second visit to the mountain, Yadav made sure to take lots of photos.

“It was to show to all the people who slandered me. I suffered a lot,” Yadav said. ‘For me, May 27, 2022 is my rebirth. It’s a new beginning.’

An Indian man accused of faking photos to prove he climbed Mount Everest in 2016 climbed the mountain in 2022

Narender Singh Yadav said he is now reborn and climbed the mountain in just six days without acclimating

It takes the average mountaineer two months to climb Everest

Narender Singh Yadav said he is now reborn and can climb the mountain in just six days without acclimating – taking the average mountaineer two months to climb Everest

Yadav made sure to snap photos of what he believes is his second visit to Mount Everest in six years

Yadav made sure to snap photos of what he believes is his second visit to Mount Everest in six years

🇮🇳Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav Fastest Everest Expedition-2022 🇮🇳 Summit of Mount Everest (8848.86 M) Summit Date May 27, 2022 Top Time 5:02 AM Total 7 Days Base Camp to Base Camp. † † Special thanks to @pioneer_expeditions @nivesh.karki @ngatenjisherpa @mingmaofficial

Posted by Narender Singh Yadavi on Sunday 29 May 2022

⚠️Death zone ⚠️ ❌South Col ❌ 🚫Camp 4 🚫 . † † †

Posted by Narender Singh Yadavi on Tuesday 31 May 2022

When he submitted the photos in 2016, mountaineers said the photos showed an oxygen mask with no tube connecting it to an oxygen tank, a lack of reflections from snow or mountains in sunglasses, and floppy flags in a place known for experiencing strong wind.

Yadav was to receive India’s prestigious Tenzing Norgay Adventure Award from the President.

But immediately after his feat was announced, authorities launched an investigation into his submission.

They concluded that the photographic evidence the climber had used to “prove” that he had reached the top of the world’s tallest mountain was, in fact, falsified.

When the news broke, Indian mountaineers and the media reacted with outrage.

“I would have done anything for the price,” he said The New York Times† “But suddenly they said to me, ‘Put the coat down and go home.'”

Yadav said his parents were humiliated by relatives and neighbors in the village they come from.

“The villagers called me a fake, an impostor,” he said. “For them it was a matter of shame.”

The couple and their team leader were banned from Nepal after an investigation was launched when they were unable to provide verifiable evidence of their summit.

Now Yadav said he has now proven himself beyond a shadow of a doubt by climbing the mountain in less than a week without acclimating — taking the average mountaineer two months to climb Everest.

The son of an Indian army soldier, Yadav, said he had practiced his summit for two years during the coronavirus lockdown, when all mountaineers were banned from climbing Everest.

“This campaign took me seven days from base camp to base camp. Another world record,” he wrote on Facebook.

But the world record for climbing Everest is actually owned by Pemba Dorje Sherpa, from Nepal, who climbed from Everest South Base Camp to the summit in eight hours and 10 minutes.

The fastest clearance of the Everest North Base Camp was achieved by Italian Hans Kammerlander in 16 hours 45 minutes, meaning Yadav has not broken either record.

“It was to show to all the people who slandered me.  I suffered a lot,

“It was to show to all the people who slandered me. I suffered a lot,” Yadav said. ‘For me, May 27, 2022 is my rebirth. It’s a new beginning’

“This campaign took me seven days from base camp to base camp.  Another world record,

Yadav is pictured with the award he says should have been his in 2016

Narender Singh Yadav is pictured with the award he says should have been in 2016. “This campaign took me seven days from base camp to base camp. Another world record,” he wrote on Facebook. In fact, the world record for climbing Everest is held by Pemba Dorje Sherpa, of Nepal, who climbed from the southern base camp to the top of Mount Everest in 8 hours and 10 minutes.

Pictured is Yadav's 2016 entry atop Everest, which community members say was photoshopped.  They said the lack of an oxygen line connected to his mask, reflections in the goggles and wind are the main benefits of the doctor's treatment - but Yadav is adamant that he has been wronged

Pictured is Yadav’s 2016 entry atop Everest, which community members say was photoshopped. They said the lack of an oxygen line connected to his mask, reflections in the goggles and wind are the main benefits of the doctor’s treatment – but Yadav is adamant that he has been wronged

In addition to the two-year ban on the two climbers and their team leader Naba Kumar Phukon, which started retroactively from May 2016, it has now been lifted.

An earlier New York Times report said the pair had both reached the “dead zone” of elevation on Everest, more than 27,000 feet above sea level and just 2,000 feet below the summit.

The report said their guide warned that their oxygen had run out and that they could not reach the top, call for rescue and retrieve the couple.

But Yadav said he had an argument with the guide, which led to the man accusing them of faking the climb to the top. He has filed a complaint with the police against his guide in Nepal.

Seven Summit Treks, which organized the expedition, were fined 50,000 rupees (just under £500), while their supporting sherpa was also fined 10,000 rupees (£100).

Reaching the top of Mount Everest, standing at 29,029 feet (8,848 meters) in the Himalayas, is considered an outstanding achievement for mountaineers around the world.

Climbers who reach the top have often become motivational speakers or have written books about their journey to reach the top.

About 800 people climb Mount Everest every year (pictured).  More than 300 people have died attempting to reach the summit since New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay first reached the summit in 1953

About 800 people climb Mount Everest every year (pictured). More than 300 people have died attempting to reach the summit since New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay first reached the summit in 1953

Climbers who reach the top have often become motivational speakers or have written books about their journey to reach the top

Climbers who reach the top have often become motivational speakers or have written books about their journey to reach the top

Currently, the system requires photos and reports from team leaders and government officials stationed at the base camp as proof of reaching the summit.

But the potential rewards mean the system is open to counterfeiting attempts, and this isn’t the first time climbers have been banned for taking pictures. The number of people trying to fake a climb has increased dramatically over the past decade.

In 2016, another Indian couple – both police officers – were banned for 10 years for faking photographs they believed were on top of Everest.

The pair posted themselves and banners in photos taken by another Indian climber – Satyarup Siddhanta – at the summit.

About 800 people climb Mount Everest every year. Since New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay first reached the summit in 1953, more than 300 people have died trying to reach the summit.

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