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ISIS Beatle nicknamed Jihadi Paul ‘to be deported to Britain’

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ISIS Beatle, nicknamed Jihadi Paul, is ‘deported from Turkey to Britain’ to face charges of torturing hostages

  • Aine Davis, 42, is deported from Turkey to the UK after serving time in prison for terrorism
  • Davis has served his sentence and will be returned to Britain – where he is a citizen
  • It is unknown if he will be arrested on his arrival in the UK
  • He denies reports that he was part of the British ISIS execution team nicknamed ‘The Beatles’

A member of the ‘ISIS Beatles’ is sent back to the UK from Turkey after serving a terrorism sentence in the country.

Aine Davis is accused of being part of Britain’s ISIS execution team and was captured by Turkish forces in 2015 before being convicted of his membership in the extremist group.

Davis has served his sentence in Turkey and authorities plan to return him to Britain because the country does not want to become a ‘landfill’ for Western terrorists.

The alleged ‘Beatle’ has retained his British citizenship and it is believed that this will make it difficult for the government to refuse his entry.

Aine Davis (pictured) accused of being part of British ISIS execution team nicknamed ‘the Beatles’

However, sources have disputed that he was part of the infamous terror cell made up of Britons and led by the so-called 'Jihadi John' (pictured)

However, sources have disputed that he was part of the infamous terror cell made up of Britons and led by the so-called ‘Jihadi John’ (pictured)

However, sources have disputed that he was part of the infamous terror cell made up of British and led by the so-called ‘Jihadi John’.

It is not known whether Davis will be arrested upon his return to Britain.

The Telegraph reported that if Davis is considered a threat to national security, he will remain under intense surveillance to protect the public.

He denied being part of the cell headed by ‘Jihadi John’ – real name Mohammed Emwazi – in his Turkish trial.

Emwazi, a member of the so-called ‘Isis Beatles’, was featured in several sickening videos showing the beheadings of Western prisoners. He was killed by a US drone strike in 2015.

Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh are both British, but they renounced their citizenships when they joined ISIS in Syria in 2014

Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh are both British, but they renounced their citizenships when they joined ISIS in Syria in 2014

His release and deportation come months after two Beatles members were convicted of terrorism in the United States in April.

Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh are both British, but they renounced their citizenships when they joined ISIS in Syria in 2014.

They killed two dozen hostages, including Americans James Foley, Steven Sotloff, Peter Kassig and Kayla Mueller, and at least eight other hostages from various countries, including the UK.

Kotey and Elsheikh were both found guilty of terrorism charges in Virginia, US, and the former was sentenced to life in prison.

Elsheikh will be convicted in August for his crimes.

‘The Beatles’ got their name from British hostage John Cantlie, a freelance journalist who used the name as a code so he could talk secretly about his captors.

News of Davis’s release and deportation comes a day after the only suicide bomber to survive France’s worst terrorist attack in recent history was sentenced to life in prison.

Salah Abdeslam, 32, has no hope of parole for his part in the November 2015 atrocities that killed 130 people

Salah Abdeslam, 32, has no hope of parole for his part in the November 2015 atrocities that killed 130 people

Abdeslam (right) stands alongside some of the other defendants in this court sketch taken Monday in the special courtroom built for the 2015 bombings trial

Abdeslam (right) stands alongside some of the other defendants in this court sketch taken Monday in the special courtroom built for the 2015 bombings trial

Those in the area at the time of the attacks comfort each other after gunmen and suicide bombers attacked busy restaurants and bars, as well as the Bataclan itself

Rescuers help a woman after the attack by Islamic State militants outside the Bataclan Theater in Paris, November 13, 2015.

The devastating attacks were the greatest peacetime atrocity in modern French history, sending shockwaves across the country.

The Bataclan and other targets paid hundreds of tributes to those who lost their lives in the attacks, which killed 130 people

The Bataclan and other targets paid hundreds of tributes to those who lost their lives in the attacks, which killed 130 people

Salah Abdeslam, 32, has no hope of parole for his part in the November 2015 atrocities that killed 130 people.

On Wednesday evening, five specialist anti-terrorist judges in Paris announced that Abdeslam, along with 18 other suspects, was guilty of several terrorism-related charges.

Abdeslam was “fully integrated into the terrorist cell,” said court president Jean-Louis Périès.

It followed a ten-month marathon trial in a purpose-built courthouse at the Palais de Justice in Paris.

Abdeslam, a French-Moroccan from Belgium, claimed he was deliberately withdrawing from the frenzy in which other ISIS terrorists, including his own brother, were shot to pieces.

He begged for leniency this week, saying, “I know there is still hatred for me. I ask you to hate me in moderation.’

He also described himself as a “soldier with Islamic State” and was remanded in a prison on the outskirts of Paris.

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