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Kyrie Irving posts a 2002 video of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ claims of a ‘new world order’

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NBA star Kyrie Irving shared a 2002 video by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones to his Instagram story.

The Brooklyn Nets security guard raised eyebrows on Thursday when he posted the 20-year-old clip of Jones discussing a “New World Order.”

The video, titled “Never Forget – Alex Jones Tried To Warn Us,” hints at a “New World Order” that would “drive away plagues.”

In the video, Jones said, “Yeah, there have been corrupt empires. Yes, they manipulate. Yes, there are secret societies. Yes, there have been oligarchies throughout history.

“And yes, today, in 2002, there is a tyrannical organization that calls itself the New World Order… by bringing diseases, viruses and pests at us, we are essentially being pushed into their system.”

Jones’ 2002 clip was one of several videos shared Thursday with Irving’s story. Irving, who serves as vice president of the players’ association executive committee, posted videos discussing a range of topics, including “the saturation of the media with celebratory reports of the late Queen Elizabeth II” and decolonization.

Kyrie Irving shared a 2002 video of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on his Instagram story

The 20-year-old video, titled 'Never Forget - Alex Jones Tried To Warn Us', hints at a 'New World Order' that would 'drive out plagues'

The 20-year-old video, titled ‘Never Forget – Alex Jones Tried To Warn Us’, hints at a ‘New World Order’ that would ‘drive out plagues’

Irving is no stranger to conspiracies who have long been willing to embrace theories such as that the Earth is flat or that the moon landing was staged.

The unvaccinated basketball star was unable to play at home games in Brooklyn last year because he failed to meet a New York City vaccine mandate for many indoor spaces.

Brooklyn Nets security guard was willing to embrace theories like the Earth is flat or the moon landing was staged

Brooklyn Nets security guard was willing to embrace theories like the Earth is flat or the moon landing was staged

In October 2021, he started following and liking Instagram posts from a conspiracy theorist who claimed that “secret societies” are implanting vaccines in a plot to connect black people to a master computer for “a Satan’s plan.”

When he apologized in October 2018 for his endorsement of the flat Earth “theory,” Iriving admitted to being a conspiracy theorist.

“I was definitely at the time, ‘I’m a great conspiracy theorist. You can’t tell me anything.’ I’m all sorry,” Irving said.

“Even if you believe in that, don’t come out and say things like that. That is for intimate conversations, because perception and how you are received changes. I’m actually a smart person,” he explained, 18 months after first telling an interviewer, “The Earth is flat. The earth is flat. … It’s right in front of us.’

But the decision to post Jones’ clip is particularly controversial as the InfoWars conspiracy theorist is currently being sued for promoting the Sandy Hook Elementary School hoax story, in which he claimed the tragedy was staged by actors.

In an pending civil suit, Jones is forced to pay unlimited damages to the eight families and an FBI agent who is suing him for defamation.

Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones is charged with spreading Sandy Hook Elementary School hoax story, in which he claimed the tragedy was staged by actors

Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones is charged with spreading Sandy Hook Elementary School hoax story, in which he claimed the tragedy was staged by actors

The trial will determine how much money the Texas media mogul must pay to the families of the victims of the Newtown, Connecticut, school massacre. He was held liable for damages in November last year by default judgment.

The civil case, the second of three, is a consolidation of lawsuits by 15 family members and an FBI agent against the shock jock.

Jones was ordered by a Texas jury last month to pay nearly $50 million to the parents of one of the murdered children.

This current case could be financially much more devastating than the $50 million Texas verdict against Jones last month in a civil suit by the parents of 6-year-old Jesse Lewis, who died in the shooting on December 14, 2012.

Attorney Chris Mattei, who represents 15 people suing the Texas media mogul, said Jones made $232,000 in a single day when the InfoWars website ran the story that the FBI said no deaths had been reported.

Jones reportedly made $232,000 in one day when the InfoWars website ran the story that the FBI said no deaths had been reported

Jones reportedly made $232,000 in one day when the InfoWars website ran the story that the FBI said no deaths had been reported

Chris Mattei, the attorney for the families suing Jones, tried to draw a direct line between the InfoWars lies about Sandy Hook and the money he made

Chris Mattei, the attorney for the families suing Jones, tried to draw a direct line between the InfoWars lies about Sandy Hook and the money he made

“$232,000 a day, just on that one platform,” Mattei said, according to the… News Times. “What you see there is the relationship between the lie, the public and the money tree.”

However, the lawyer said the case is not just about the money.

“Unless you stop a bully, a bully will never stop itself,” he said.

In February 2020, Jones emailed another day admission, this time the number had grown dramatically.

“We made about $810K yesterday,” he wrote.

‘One day. Do the math,” Mattei told the jury.

Jones, who is expected to testify, failed to show up on the first day of the trial in Waterbury, less than 20 miles from Newtown, where the children and six teachers were shot, prompting Judge Barbara Bellis to sentence the millionaire podcaster.

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