Mike Tindall stars in heartbreaking video about father’s 20-year battle with Parkinson’s

Emotional Mike Tindall highlights the importance of a support network in a touching video about his father Philip’s 20-year struggle with Parkinson’s disease

  • Former England rugby star MikeTindall is a patron of the Cure Parkinson charity
  • Talked about the importance of a support network when touching video
  • Father Philip, from Yorkshire, has been battling an incurable condition since 2003










Mike Tindall has revealed how much talking about his father’s 20-year battle with Parkinson’s disease with other families has helped Philip’s journey.

In a candid interview with BBC breakfast‘s Sally Nugent, the former England rugby star, 42, stressed the importance of a support network.

Mike, who shares three children with the Queen’s granddaughter Zara Tindall, admitted that the professional advice offered can vary so much that “you almost have to read the stories to find out what works for you.”

Mike has been a patron of the Cure Parkinson charity since 2018 and regularly participates in fundraising events and challenges to raise money for charity.

Mike Tindall has revealed how much sharing his experience of his father’s 20-year battle with Parkinson’s disease with other families has helped his journey

In a video of the former rugby player visiting families affected by Parkinson’s, Mike said: “There is a real place to build a database that is easy for anyone to use, interact with and people to share their stories, to share their symptoms.

“A tool that people who are newly diagnosed or if people are on the path and just on a plateau can go and try to tap into and build a little bit of skills on their own.”

‘Of course doctors and neurologists will differ in their advice.

“You almost have to read the stories to find out what works for you, what suits you better.”

Mike's father Philip has had the condition for about two decades, but was only officially diagnosed in 2003, just before the Rugby World Cup.

Mike’s father Philip has had the condition for about two decades, but was only officially diagnosed in 2003, just before the Rugby World Cup.

In a candid interview with BBC Breakfast's Sally Nugent, the former England rugby star, 42, emphasized the importance of a support network

In a candid interview with BBC Breakfast’s Sally Nugent, the former England rugby star, 42, emphasized the importance of a support network

Speaking of David, 77, who has been living with the disease for 14 years, he said: ‘It’s such a wide spectrum of people, I feel connected to David because I see what my mom and dad are going through.

“It’s a very similar age when they were diagnosed, very similar story, slower symptoms.

“The same goes for Amarpal, he figured it out for himself and it was actually fascinating.”

Mike, who shares three children with the Queen's granddaughter Zara Tindall, admitted that the professional advice offered can vary so much that

Mike, who shares three children with the Queen’s granddaughter Zara Tindall, admitted that the professional advice offered can vary so much that “you almost have to read the stories to find out what works for you.” (seen with Zara at Ascot in 2021)

In June, Mike recalled how his father was an athlete who played rugby and excelled in all sports, but now “suddenly has trouble picking up a pen.”

He also expressed his sadness that Philip, who turned 75 this week, will no longer be able to play with his children – daughters Mia, seven, and Lena, two, and newborn son Lucas.

Mike visited his parents at home in Yorkshire for the first time this year, after not seeing them for six months due to lockdown restrictions in the UK.

He revealed that his father has had the condition for about two decades, but was only officially diagnosed in 2003, just before the Rugby World Cup.

WHAT IS PARKINSON? THE INcurable DISEASE THAT BOXER MUHAMMAD ALI . REPORTS

Parkinson’s disease affects one in 500 people, including about one million Americans.

It causes muscle stiffness, slowness of movement, tremors, sleep disturbances, chronic fatigue, reduced quality of life and can lead to severe disability.

It is a progressive neurological disorder that destroys cells in the part of the brain that controls movement.

Sufferers are known to have a reduced supply of dopamine because the nerve cells that cause it have died.

There is currently no cure and no way to stop the progression of the disease, but hundreds of scientific trials are underway to try to change that.

The disease claimed the life of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in 2016.

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