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NASA selects three ‘placeholder’ dates for its Artemis 1 mission

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NASA selects three ‘placeholder’ dates for its Artemis 1 mission: Launch of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft will take place no earlier than August 29

  • NASA has announced that Artemis I will launch on August 29, September 2 or 5
  • The dates were announced during a press conference on Wednesday
  • James Free, associate administrator at NASA headquarters in Washington DC, said the exact date will be determined about a week before the launch.

NASA announced Wednesday that it has selected three possible dates for its Artemis I mission — the first phase of its landmark operation to send the first woman and person of color to the moon.

The US space agency aims to launch the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center on August 29.

And September 2 and 5 are marked as backup launch dates.

James Free, associate administrator at NASA’s Washington DC headquarters, said the exact date will be determined about a week before launch.

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The US space agency aims to launch the Space Launch System (SLS) (pictured) rocket and Orion spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center on August 29. And September 2 and 5 are marked as backup start dates

Artemis I, which has suffered several delays over the past two and a half years, will finally launch an unmanned Orion capsule that will fly around the moon and splash back into the Atlantic Ocean.

The news of the official launch comes weeks after NASA held a final wet dress rehearsal that it deemed successful.

Catherine Hamilton, NASA communications agency, said at a press conference, “Artemis I will be a bolt-on flight test that will provide a foundation for human space exploration and demonstrate our equipment and capabilities and human systems to the moon and eventually Mars.”

The rehearsal included refueling and counting down for about 50 straight hours – it started on June 20 and ended on June 23.

Artemis I, who has suffered several delays over the past two and a half years, will finally launch an unmanned Orion capsule that will fly around the moon and splash back into the Atlantic Ocean.

Artemis I, who has suffered several delays over the past two and a half years, will finally launch an unmanned Orion capsule that will fly around the moon and splash back into the Atlantic Ocean.

Pictured is an artist's impression of the Orion craft soaring through space

Pictured is an artist’s impression of the Orion craft soaring through space

Although it was deemed successful, there was a point when hydrogen leaked from the rocket.

However, NASA determined that the problem did not cripple the mission.

NASA’s ROCKET WITH SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM IS THE BIGGEST EVER MADE AND ALLOWS PEOPLE TO DISCOVER THE SOLAR SYSTEM

Space Launch System, or SLS, is a launch vehicle that NASA hopes will take its astronauts back to the moon and beyond.

The rocket will have an initial lift configuration, expected to be launched in early 2020, followed by an improved ‘evolved lift capacity’ capable of carrying heavier payloads.

Initial Lift Capacity of the Space Launch System

– First flight: mid 2020

– Height: 311 feet (98 meters)

– Lift: 70 tons

– Weight: 2.5 million kilograms (5.5 million lbs)

Space Launch System Evolved Lifting Capacity

– First flight: Unknown

– Height: 384 feet (117 meters)

– Lift: 130 tons

– Weight: 2.9 million kilograms (6.5 million lbs)

“NASA has reviewed the rehearsal records and determined that the testing campaign is complete. The agency will return SLS and Orion to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at Kennedy next week to prepare the rocket and spacecraft for launch and repair a leak detected during the most recent rehearsal,” agency officials said. on June 23.

“NASA plans to bring SLS and Orion back to the launch pad by the end of August,” she added. “NASA will determine a specific target launch date after replacing hardware related to the vulnerability.”

Artemis I has been delayed several times – it was initially scheduled for November 2020.

The first pause came after the coronavirus took hold of the world two and a half years ago and when Hurricane Ida hit the US, which also kept the missile grounded even longer.

The SLS rocket is also plagued with its own problems – from mechanical to software.

The Artemis I mission will combine the Orion spacecraft, the SLS and the ground systems at Kennedy to launch the Orion 280,000 miles beyond Earth or around the moon over the course of a three-week mission.

This spacecraft, built primarily by Lockheed Martin, will “stay in space longer than any ship has done for astronauts without docking at a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before,” NASA previously said.

If Artemis I is a success, NASA will send Artemis II on a trip around the moon in 2024, this time with a human crew on board.

The Artemis II mission plans to send four astronauts in the first manned Orion capsule for up to 21 days in a lunar flight.

Both missions are test flights to demonstrate the technology and capabilities of Orion, SLS and the Artemis mission before NASA puts human boots back on the moon.

The Artemis mission will be the first to land humans on the moon since NASA’s Apollo 17 in 1972. The first woman and first person of color is expected to set foot on the surface sometime in 2025.

With an estimated $1 billion per launch, the space agency wants to make sure that any problems or errors are picked up before the single-use rocket leaves Earth.

NASA will land the first woman and first person of color on the moon in 2025 as part of the Artemis mission

Artemis was the twin sister of Apollo and goddess of the moon in Greek mythology.

NASA has chosen her to personify the path back to the moon, which will see astronauts return to the lunar surface by 2025 — including the first woman and the next man.

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars.

Artemis 1 will be the first integrated flight test of NASA’s deep space exploration system: the Orion spacecraft, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Artemis 1 will be an unmanned flight that will provide a foundation for human exploration of deep space and demonstrate our commitment and capacity to extend human existence to the moon and beyond.

During this flight, the spacecraft will launch on the most powerful rocket in the world and fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown.

It will travel 280,000 miles (450,600 km) from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the moon over the course of a mission of about three weeks.

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars.  This image explains the different stages of the mission

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars. This image explains the different stages of the mission

Orion will stay in space longer than any other astronaut ship has done without docking in a space station and returning home faster and hotter than ever before.

With this first exploration mission, NASA is leading the next steps of human exploration into deep space, where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems near the moon needed for lunar surface missions and exploration to other destinations further from Earth, including Mars. .

They take the crew on a different trajectory and test Orion’s critical systems with people on board.

Together, Orion, SLS and the ground systems at Kennedy will be able to meet the most challenging needs of crew and cargo missions in deep space.

Ultimately, NASA aims to establish a sustainable human presence on the moon by 2028 as a result of the Artemis mission.

The space agency hopes this colony will discover new scientific discoveries, demonstrate new technological advances and lay the foundation for private companies to build a lunar economy.

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