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New James Webb images of Jupiter are ‘stunners’ showing planet’s auroras at the poles

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NASA has shared two new images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) that capture the stunning auroras glowing around Jupiter’s north and south poles caused by fluctuations in the planet’s magnetic field.

As Jupiter rotates, it drags along its magnetic field that is bombarded by particles of solar wind — a process similar to how solar winds create Earth’s beautiful auroras.

Together with the glowing poles, the images show incredible detail of the turbulent atmosphere, rings around the planet and some of Jupiter’s 79 moons can be seen glowing around the giant planet.

Astronomers working with JWST are equally surprised to see the stunning detail in the images, and astronomer Imke de Pater says he and the team didn’t expect the results to be this good.

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James Webb captured stunning new images of Jupiter that show the gas giant’s stunning auroras at its north and south poles. One image, showing only Jupiter, is a composite of several images and shows the auroras blowing in bright orange, yellow and green over both the northern and southern poles of Jupiter

“It’s really remarkable that we can see details on Jupiter along with its rings, small satellites and even galaxies in one image,” said de Pater, who is also a professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley.

The images were taken with the telescope’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), which can detect light from the earliest stars and galaxies.

JWST uses a wide range of infrared light to “see” back in time, which is done by analyzing the time it takes light to travel through space.

And it used three specialized infrared filters to reveal Jupiter’s stunning detail.

Infrared light is invisible to the human eye, but the light was mapped to the visible spectrum, a range of wavelengths that we can see.

The images show rings surrounding the massive planet, along with two small moons called Amalthea and Adrastea.  The faint spots in the lower background are likely to be galaxies photobombing this Jovian view

The images show rings surrounding the massive planet, along with two small moons called Amalthea and Adrastea. The faint spots in the lower background are likely to be galaxies photobombing this Jovian view

One image, showing only Jupiter, is a composite of several images and shows the auroras blowing in bright orange, yellow and green over both the northern and southern poles of Jupiter.

The Great Red Spot, a famous storm so large it could swallow the Earth, appears white in these views, like other clouds, because they reflect a lot of sunlight.

Heidi Hammel, an interdisciplinary scientist at Webb for solar system observations and vice president of science at the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, said in a statement: “The brightness here indicates high altitude — so the Great Red Spot has nebulae on it.” high altitude, as does the equatorial region.

“The numerous bright white ‘spots’ and ‘streaks’ are probably very large cloud tops from condensed convective storms.” In contrast, dark ribbons north of the equatorial region have little cloud cover.’

The images show rings surrounding the massive planet, along with two small moons called Amalthea and Adrastea. The faint spots in the lower background are likely to be galaxies ‘photobombing’ this Jovian view.

JWST released other images of Jupiter in July, showing the gas giant glowing oranges and reds, while also describing its rings and three moons: Europa, Thebes and Metis.

JWST released other images of Jupiter in July, showing the gas giant glowing oranges and reds, while also describing its rings and three moons: Europa, Thebes and Metis.

Shortly after these images were released, astronomers announced that the telescope may have captured its first supernova, which is

Shortly after these images were released, astronomers announced that the telescope may have captured its first supernova, which is “last hurrah” that occurs when the star’s fuel runs out. This causes the pressure to drop, expanding the cosmic object to at least five times the mass of our sun and then detonating, releasing tons of debris and particles.

“This one image summarizes the science of our Jupiter system program, which studies the dynamics and chemistry of Jupiter itself, its rings and its satellite system,” Thierry Fouchet, a professor at the Paris Observatory, as part of an international collaboration for Webb’s Early Release Science program, said.

NASA and the successor to the European Space Agency’s $10 billion Hubble Space Telescope rocketed like a rocket late last year, observing the cosmos in infrared since the summer.

With Webb, scientists hope to witness the dawn of the universe, looking all the way back to when the first stars and galaxies formed 13.7 billion years ago.

JWST released additional images of Jupiter in July, showing the gas giant glowing orange and red, while also describing its rings and three moons: Europa, Thebes and Metis.

Shortly after these images were released, astronomers announced that the telescope may have captured its first supernova, which is “last hurrah” that occurs when the star’s fuel runs out.

This causes the pressure to drop, with the cosmic object expanding to at least five times the mass of our sun — which is the size of about 333,000 Earths — then exploding, releasing tons of debris and particles.

The image shows a bright light three billion light-years from Earth that was not present in images of the galaxy taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2011.

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