Nike Boss Larry Miller Reveals He Killed 18-Year-Old Boy While He Was In A Teen Gang

The president of Nike’s successful brand Jordan has revealed that in 1965 he murdered an innocent 18-year-old boy while he was a member of a gang.

Larry Miller, 72, announced in a Sports Illustrated interview Wednesday that he had served time in prison after fatally shooting Edward White when he was a 16-year-old member of Philly’s Cedar Avenue gang.

Miller says he took to the streets drunk and seeking revenge after one of his friends and fellow gang members was fatally stabbed by a member of the rival 53rd and Pine gang.

The business magnate didn’t know White, but wanted to avenge the murder of a fellow gang member and says he ended up shooting and killing the first person he saw.

White did nothing to provoke him, and there is no suggestion that he was a member of any other gang. He died on the spot after being shot with a .38 his girlfriend gave Miller.

Explaining himself, Miller said, “We were all drunk. I was in a haze. Once it started, I thought, “Oh, sh*t, what have I done?” It took me years to understand the real impact of what I had done.

“That makes it even more difficult for me, because it was for nothing.

“I mean, there was no valid reason for this to happen. And that’s what I really struggle with and that’s — you know, it’s what I think about every day. It’s like I did this, and to someone who — it wasn’t a reason to do it. And that’s the part that really bothers me.’

Successful businessman and current Jordan brand chairman Larry Miller has publicly revealed that he has been in prison after fatally shooting a teenager in 1965.

Miller will detail the murder in his upcoming book Jump

Miller will detail the murder in his upcoming book Jump

Miller did not reveal exactly what he was charged with in connection with White’s death or how long he spent in prison, but did indicate that he has been in and out of juvenile detention and prison for various offenses between the ages of 13 and 30. .

He says he came from a good family, with a mother and father who loved and cared for him, and was a real student. Miller says he derailed at age 13 after deciding he wanted people to “respect” him more.

He says he will share more details in his upcoming book, which is being co-written with his daughter. No photos of White have been shared and members of his family have not yet commented.

Nike, famed for its desire to present itself as one of the United States’ most awake companies, has backed its CEO with a gushing statement.

CEO John Donahue gushed: “Larry Miller has played an influential role in Nike history and is a beloved member of the Nike family.

His story exemplifies the resilience, perseverance and power of the human spirit. I hope his experience can lead to a healthy discourse on criminal justice reform by removing the stigma that holds people and communities back.”

Miller, who has also had prominent roles with Campbell Soup, Kraft Foods and the Portland Trail Blazers, decided to share his story after suffering severe migraines and recurring nightmares. He hopes by being made public that he can prevent others, especially at-risk youth, from making a similar mistake.

“It’s eating me up inside,” Miller said. “If I could go back and undo it, I absolutely would. I can not do it. So all I can do is try to do what I can to help other people and maybe try to prevent this from happening to anyone else.”

Miller decided to share his story after suffering from severe migraines and recurring nightmares. He hopes by going public that he can prevent others, especially at-risk youth, from making a similar mistake

While incarcerated, Miller earned an accounting degree from Temple University.

After regaining his freedom, he looked for a job at the prestigious accountancy firm Arthur Andersen.

During his last interview for the position, Miller revealed details of his past, which he says cost him the position.

“I had an offer here ready to give you. But I can’t give it to you now. I can’t take the risk of this somehow hitting back,” said the partner, Miller said.

Miller claims it was at that point that he made the decision never to share his story again.

While he claims he never lied on a job interview, Miller said he lived in fear, especially as his career progressed and he was constantly in the spotlight.

He was able to escape revealing the murder, as most employers only asked for details of criminal convictions from the past five years.

Miller even went to the White House when Bill Clinton was president, and told of his shock when the security clearance came back properly.

‘[I worried] that someone would tap me on the shoulder and say, “Hey, aren’t you…?” Or: ‘Haven’t you…?’ And then everything would just collapse,” he said.

“Just that pressure that built up by holding this in and fearing it would come out and ruin everything.”

Miller (pictured center with Rick Mina to his left) says his friends, including Michael Jordan (right), and colleagues are supporting him to share his story

Miller (pictured center with Rick Mina to his left) says his friends, including Michael Jordan (right), and colleagues are supporting him to share his story

He continued, “I took all these high-profile jobs. I’m like, ‘What’s the matter with me? Why am I putting myself out like that?’

Miller decided to share his story in the upcoming book Jump: My Secret Journey from the Streets to the Boardroom that he co-wrote with his daughter, Laila Lacy.

However, he decided to talk about the shooting before the novel was released on January 18, 2022, as he wanted to make details of his past public on its terms and timeline.

“This was a very difficult decision for me, because I ran from it for 40 years. I tried to hide this and hoped people wouldn’t find out,” Miller said.

He took the same approach when informing his friends, including former NBA star Michael Jordan, Commissioner Adam Silver and several Nike executives.

Nike (headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon, pictured) CEO John Donohoe said Miller's story is one of

Nike (headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon, pictured) CEO John Donohoe said Miller’s story is one of “resilience, perseverance and strength”

Silver echoed Nike’s claims, saying that while he was “stunned” after never hearing a “rumor or whisper” about Miller’s criminal past, he was amazed at the businessman’s strength.

“Then I went from stunned to amazed that Larry had managed his long and highly successful professional career, operating at the highest level in our industry, with this secret firmly intact, and finally I was left with a sense of sadness that Larry had this burden.” to behave. all these years without the support of his many friends and colleagues,” he said.

Jordan, while not directly quoted, is also said to have been supportive.

Meanwhile, Miller is ready to present “both versions of himself” to his loved ones and the public in the hopes that others can follow his path.

“It set me free,” he said. “I now feel the freedom to be myself.”

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