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Packers QB Aaron Rodgers Tells Joe Rogan About Ayahuasca

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Not only has Ayahuasca helped Aaron Rodgers win consecutive NFL MVP awards, but the powerful psychedelic Amazonia also has the power to heal the world’s problems, says the Green Bay Packers quarterback.

‘[There was] me and me after ayahuasca,” Rodgers told his friend and health guru, podcaster Joe Rogan, during… Saturday episode.

Rodgers, 38, revealed earlier this month that he drank the hallucinogenic brew during a 2020 trip to Peru to honor MVP.

The psychedelic trip didn’t violate NFL rules on banned substances, but it did give him a new perspective on himself and his connection to “all living things and all plants and fungi.”

Speaking to Rogan, a longtime comedian whose advice he sought while battling COVID-19 last November, Rodgers suggested that many of the world’s problems could be solved if more people took psychedelic mushrooms.

Rogan immediately agreed.

“Isn’t it funny that that sounds crazy to say, but that would literally fix the world: if more people had psychedelic trips and more people had more experiences that dissolved their egos and more people understood that community is that” It’s just a bunch of people living together, it’s a bunch of people who care about each other — and that we can treat the world as a community,” Rogan said.

“I couldn’t agree more with you,” Rodgers replied.

Not only has Ayahuasca helped Aaron Rodgers win consecutive NFL MVP awards, but the powerful psychedelic Amazonia also has the power to heal the world’s problems, according to the Green Bay Packers quarterback.

Joe Rogan (pictured) is a friend of Rodgers and health guru of the Packers QB, after advising him on his treatment options for COVID-19 in November

Joe Rogan (pictured) is a friend of Rodgers and health guru of the Packers QB, after advising him on his treatment options for COVID-19 in November

Ayahuasca is native to South America and causes hallucinations when consumed in a liquid

Ayahuasca is native to South America and causes hallucinations when consumed in a liquid

Rogan asked how my psychedelic use takes place among NFL players, but Rodgers declined, saying he didn’t really know.

What the California native did know is that the revelation of his ayahuasca trip sparked the interest of several people.

“It’s been really interesting to see how the people stretch out across the league – and there’s a lot of people outside the league, entertainers, sports people, just past friends, people who work at the league. [Packers practice] facility, just the 9-to-5 people — all interested in plant medicine,” Rodgers said.

“I think it’s been very interesting. I think there’s a hunger for what I’ve been through, which you talked about on mushrooms – this death of the ego, this realization that we are all connected, this greater sense of what community is.”

Rodgers says taking psychedelics can help beat depression by teaching people to love themselves.

“…when you dissolve the ego, the amount of love you can return to yourself and then to other people, for me it takes away so much judgment of myself and others, so much separation between myself and others,” Rodgers continued.

“The greater sense of belonging was overwhelming when I kind of got out of that and went back to ‘reality’ or whatever. It’s like ‘oh s***, now here’s the integration.’ Here I am in a different form. Here is my reflection I see of myself and you, and we are all connected in such a deeper way. Just doing a plant that has been used for generations in the Amazon jungles. And I got the same feeling with mushrooms – just an incredible connection with nature and life and all living things and all plants and fungi.’

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) walks on the field for an NFL preseason football game against the New Orleans Saints on August 19

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) walks on the field for an NFL preseason football game against the New Orleans Saints on August 19

Rodgers didn’t think of himself as an embittered person before, but after ayahuasca, he thinks he’s been better at getting rid of negativity.

“From my previous self I feel the anger and bitterness and resentment and negativity, which I kind of like, by default, walk around with – and it wasn’t like a super high level – but I felt like getting out of those experiences, it’s like : ‘that s*** doesn’t even matter,’ he said. ‘Like, kindness is important. Connection is important.

“Being present with people, having conversations is important,” Rodgers continued, as he began to focus on digital communication. “Putting your damn technology away and connecting with it – because I think on a deeper level we all just want to be seen and understood – and that’s why social media is such a platform, because everyone’s just, ‘Look at me damn it! This is my opinion, and it fucking matters!’

Rodgers and Rogan were both the target of criticism on social media in November when it was revealed that the Packers QB had not been vaccinated and had been infected with COVID-19.

The controversy started before the 2021 season, when Rodgers was asked if he had been vaccinated and instead told reporters that he had been “immunized” against COVID-19.

What Rodgers didn’t explain at the time was that he wasn’t getting the vaccination, but rather a therapeutic treatment prescribed by a doctor to boost his resistance to the virus.

That meaningful distinction was clarified in November, when Rodgers tested positive for coronavirus and was subsequently quarantined for 10 days — the minimum amount of time an unvaccinated player must quarantine, under league rules at the time (the NFL has since reduced the quarantine). ) time).

After Rodgers initially blamed the media and the “woke mob” for the misunderstanding, Rodgers told radio host and former NFL gambler Pat McAfee on Nov. 9 that he wanted to apologize “to anyone who felt misled.” He also said he was fighting his COVID-19 infection with recommendations from Rogan, a notorious vaccine skeptic.

With Rogan, however, Rodgers actually admitted using the word “immunized” to cut off discussion about his vaccination status before the media could find out that he hadn’t received the shot.

“So I was ready for this question all the time and had thought about how I wanted to answer it and I’d come to the conclusion that I’m going to say, I’m ‘immunized,'” Rodgers told Rogan on his podcast.

“And if there’s a follow-up, talk about my trial, but I thought there’s a possibility that I say I’ve been vaccinated, maybe they’ll understand what that means.

“Maybe not, maybe they’re following it up. They didn’t follow up. So, then I go the season that they think, some of them, that I was vaccinated, right, because the only follow-up they asked was basically they asked me to reprimand my teammates, like, ‘Say what you against your teammates’ not vaccinated?’

Rodgers only missed one game due to the infection, but has since been at war with reporters on several issues, while continuing to share his skepticism about the vaccine.

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