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Pennsylvania records first case of monkey pox

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Pennsylvania registers first case of monkeypox: enters list of ten US states to detect 19 cases of the virus

  • Pennsylvania has registered one case of monkeypox, health leaders have revealed
  • No further details have been released about the patient, including their location
  • But previous cases were mostly among gay and bisexual men
  • They have also been linked to recent trips to Europe or Canada with outbreaks

Pennsylvania has become the last state to detect a case of monkeypox, health chiefs announced on Thursday.

It brings the number in the US to 19 in no fewer than ten states, after another three infections were reported yesterday.

Pennsylvania officials have not yet released any details about the new case, including its gender, location and whether it is related to international travel.

But most infections in the US have been found among gay and bisexual men who recently returned from abroad.

It’s the latest in a global outbreak with more than 500 cases of the tropical disease seen in two dozen countries outside of West Africa — where it’s native.

World Health Organization chiefs are calling on people to limit their sexual contact in order to stop the transmission of the virus.

Monkeypox has now been discovered in 19 US states. Some of these cases have only tested positive for orthopoxviruses – a family that includes monkeypox – but it is overwhelmingly likely that these will be confirmed as the tropical disease

Pictured above are the early spot symptoms caused by monkey pox.  After the marks appear, they become hollow and turn black before finally falling off

Pictured above are the early spot symptoms caused by monkey pox. After the marks appear, they become hollow and turn black before finally falling off

Pictured above are symptoms caused by monkeypox infection.  Anyone with these warning signs is asked to come forward

Pictured above are symptoms caused by monkeypox infection. Anyone with these warning signs is asked to come forward

Reduce your number of sexual partners to fight monkey pox, urges World Health Organization

People should reduce their number of sexual partners to help fight the spread of monkey pox, the World Health Organization urged yesterday.

dr. Hans Kluge, the head of the WHO’s European branch, has warned that the current outbreak of the tropical disease “may not be manageable”.

He warned that Europe had become the new epicenter of the virus, with the outbreak linked to sexual transmission at raves and festivals across the continent.

dr. Kluge insisted the virus “will not require the same extensive population measures” as Covid, but said “significant and urgent” action was needed to prevent more cases.

He added that while the cases have been concentrated in men who have sex with men, there was nothing to prevent its spread to other groups.

The Pennsylvania case was revealed in a dashboard update by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

It is currently unknown whether monkeypox infection is suspected or confirmed.

Most reported cases initially tested positive for orthopoxviruses — the family that includes monkeypox and smallpox — before being sent to the CDC for confirmatory Pap smears.

Monkeypox is most commonly spread through physical contact with infectious skin lesions in patients.

People who are infected initially develop a fever within the first 21 days, before a rash erupts on their face and spreads to the rest of the body.

It can take up to four weeks for symptoms to disappear as the rash goes through several stages before finally falling off.

Most cases are mild, but between one in 10 and one in 100 people who are infected die from the disease.

In the US, New York has the most cases, followed by California and Florida — both of which have identified three infections.

Colorado and Utah have both seen two, while Georgia, Massachusetts, Virginia, Washington and Pennsylvania have discovered one.

There are now signs of the virus spreading on US soil, after three cases were reported in ‘close contact’ of first patients.

However, the outbreak is much worse worldwide, especially in Europe.

Spain has reported the most cases on the continent (208), followed by England (188) and Portugal (119).

WHO chiefs suggest the continent’s outbreak is linked to unprotected sex at two raves in Spain and Belgium.

Cases are currently mostly among gay and bisexual men, but health chiefs warn that nothing is stopping the spread of the disease to other groups.

There are also mounting calls to contain the outbreak, with experts saying that if the virus continues to spread, it could spill over into the animal population – which would become a reservoir.

On Wednesday, the head of WHO’s European branch, Dr Hans Kluge, called on people to reduce their number of sexual partners to help contain the outbreak.

He also warned that the tropical disease “may not be controllable” in Europe as there are still undetected chains of transmission.

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