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Peter FitzSimons’ campaign for the republic in Australia calls from $5 to get rid of queen and monarchy

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The Peter FitzSimons-led Australian Republic Movement (ARM) will call for the image of Queen Elizabeth II to be removed from the country’s existing $5 bill.

The ARM will also ask the government not to replace the Queen with the head of King Charles III on coins from next year, the Daily Mail Australia has understood.

The group has temporarily suspended its campaign for a republic until after the Queen’s funeral in London next week.

But ARM reportedly sees the removal of royals from the Australian currency as a key factor in the group’s advocacy in relaunching operations.

Peter FitzSimons (pictured) is the leader of the Australian Republic Movement, which is calling for an Australian head of state

In June, FitzSimons told Daily Mail Australia that “there is no doubt that it (Republican sentiment) will take a surge once Australia gets closer and looks at King Charles”.

However, David Flint, who has been Australians’ National Covenant for Constitutional Monarchy since 1998, takes the opposite view.

He acknowledged that Charles would not initially have the same support as his mother, but thinks that “will improve when people see that he behaves well as a king.”

“I don’t think there will be any interest in Australia becoming a republic,” he said.

A member of the ARM said: the Australian it was “ridiculous” that the Australian government had already said it would use the king’s image on coins from 2023 onwards.

Poll

Should Australia remove all members of the royal family from its notes and coins?

  • Yes, it’s time to honor more Australians on our currency 1 votes
  • No, we have to stick to the Royals on our coins and the $5 . note 16 votes

It is believed ARM will bide its time before proposing an Australian-born replacement to the royals on coins and the $5 bill.

It will initially focus on sparking public debate on the issue.

Last week, the ARM released a statement saying it is “deeply saddened by the news of Queen Elizabeth’s passing and expressing its deepest gratitude and gratitude for her services to the Commonwealth.”

The Queen replaced the humanitarian Caroline Chisholm on the $5 note in 1992 when Australia switched to polymer notes.

The Prime Minister, Anthony Albanese, said he would not consider changes to the $5 bill until after her funeral.

“I think this is a time when a little respect is required,” he said. “We will handle these matters appropriately, orderly and respectfully.”

On Tuesday, the Assistant Secretary of State for Competition, Andrew Leigh, was asked in the government to… open to put an Indigenous Australian on the $5 bill like Eddie Mabo, Vincent Lingiari or Evonne Goolagong?

“That will be a conversation on the road,” he replied.

‘Our focus is now on the coins, they must be exchanged… There is no rush.

“So the priority now is to change the coins, which is a much bigger operation… 15 billion coins have been produced with Queen Elizabeth II on them,” said Mr Leigh.

Prince Charles (left) is pictured with his late mother, Queen Elizabeth at her Platinum Jubilee celebrations

Prince Charles (left) is pictured with his late mother, Queen Elizabeth at her Platinum Jubilee celebrations

Australian coins issued this month before the death of the Queens will become instant collector’s items as they date back to 2023.

Mint chief executive Leigh Gordon said this party with the Queen’s profile would be worth a lot.

“We don’t plan to start minting coins with the Queen’s effigy on them in 2023, but we are in a transition period,” Gordon said.

“There are now some coins with a date of 2023 and the Queen on them – they are collectible and investment coins released as we normally do every September for the following year.”

Australian coins issued this month before the Queen's death will become instant collectibles as they date back to 2023

Australian coins issued this month before the Queen’s death will become instant collectibles as they date back to 2023

Lisa Wilkinson (left) is pictured with her husband Peter FitzSimons, the chairman of the Australian Republic Movement

Lisa Wilkinson (left) is pictured with her husband Peter FitzSimons, the chairman of the Australian Republic Movement

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