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Photos show Notting Hill Carnival’s similar scenes to past years

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For nearly 60 years, the Notting Hill Carnival in West London has been an event marked by packed streets and colourful parades as hundreds of thousands of people have gathered to celebrate Caribbean culture. 

Whilst around 1,000 people flocked to the first outdoor carnival in 1966, an estimated two million people have flocked to this year’s event, which ends today. 

But despite the dramatic uplift in its popularity, photos show the similarity between jubilant scenes in the 1970s and 1980s and those that took place yesterday and on Saturday.

One image, taken at the 1977 carnival, shows the Ladbroke Grove area of Notting Hill packed with revellers. 

The scene on Sunday was much the same, bar the wooden barriers that had been erected on the windows of The Elgin pub this time around. 

Similarly, the area around the distinctive concrete staircase at Ladbroke Grove’s Lowerwood Court apartment block was filled with people in 1976 – the year of brutal clashes with police – and yesterday. 

Dancing in the streets has also been a common sight at the carnival, with photos from 1976 and yesterday showing how nothing has changed.   

This year’s carnival – the first in three years – has seen 38 arrests made by the Metropolitan Police, compared to 353 in 2019, 74 in 2018, 313 in 2017 and 454 in 2016. 

Despite the dramatic uplift in the popularity of the Notting Hill Carnival, photos show the similarity between jubilant scenes in the 1970s and 1980s and those that took place yesterday and on Saturday. Above: One image, taken at the 1977 carnival, shows the Ladbroke Grove area of Notting Hill packed with revellers. The scene on Sunday was much the same, bar the wooden barriers that had been erected on the windows of The Elgin pub this time around

Similarly, the area around the distinctive concrete staircase at Ladbroke Grove’s Lowerwood Court apartment block was filled with people in 1976 – the year of brutal clashes with police – and yesterday

Dancing in the streets has also been a common sight at the carnival, with photos from 1976 and yesterday showing how nothing has changed

Whilst the two-day event has been celebrated in its outdoor form since 1966, it has its roots in an indoor celebration organised by Trinidadian communist Claudia Jones, who has since become known as the ‘mother of the Notting Hill Carnival’.

The Caribbean Carnival, which was held in St Pancras Town Hall in 1959 and then every year until 1966, was organised by Jones in response to difficult race relations in the aftermath of the Notting Hill race riots of 1958.

These protests played out amid the arrival in England of members of the ‘Windrush’ generation.

They were the thousands from Caribbean countries who came to Britain between 1948 and 1971 and were met by some with hostility.

Jones, who had spent 30 years in the US fighting for racial justice before being deported to Britain in 1955 after being declared ‘un-American’, organised the indoor event in the hope of bringing communities together.

Televised by the BBC, it included dancing, music and a beauty pageant. Stunning photos show Jones herself and hundreds of other enjoying themselves at the event.

Four months after the first Caribbean Carnival, the black aspiring lawyer Kelso Cochrane, who was from Antigua, died after being attacked by racists in Notting Hill.

His murder, which remains unsolved, spurred on another activist – Rhaune Laslett – to organise a children’s street fayre that ended up being the first outdoor carnival in 1966 when the popular Russ Henderson Steel Band got involved.

Despite past clashes between police and revellers, there have been more positive interactions. A photo from the 1978 carnival (above) shows police dancing with revellers

An image taken yesterday shows officers smiling as a reveller jives next to him

Despite past clashes between police and revellers, there have been more positive interactions. A photo from the 1978 carnival (left) shows police dancing with revellers; whilst an image taken yesterday shows officers smiling as a reveller jives next to him

Thousands are seen packed into Ladbroke Grove during the carnival yesterday and in 1984. Both this year and then, revellers packed out balconies to get a better view of the celebration

Londoners are seen walking through the streets near Portobello Road, both yesterday and in 1975. The photo from that year also shows a band performing on a platform

Hanging out on balconies and window ledges has been a common theme this year, as with previous years. Above: Revellers on Sunday are seen on a balcony

Three women stand outside their window in 1988

Precarious: Hanging out on balconies and window ledges has been a common theme this year, as with previous years. Above: Revellers on Sunday are seen on a balcony, as three women stand outside their window in 1988

The popularity of the carnival continued to increase during the 1970s. By 1976, there were 150,000 people attending.

The numbers were boosted thanks to the work of Leslie Palmer, who was the carnival’s organiser from 1973 until 1975.

He organised sponsorship, recruited more bands and also installed multiple static sound systems, which have remained a standout feature of the event.

The 1970s did also see significant clashes with police, most famously in 1976, when the Daily Mail proclaimed on its front page: ‘Battle at the Carnival’.

There were dozens of arrests as stones, beer cans and bottles were hurled at police. Hundreds more officers had to be drafted in to reinforce the 1,000 who were originally on duty.

Revellers are seen posing in bright outfits this morning before they enjoy the final day of the Notting Hill Carnival

Revellers are seen posing in bright outfits this morning before they enjoy the final day of the Notting Hill Carnival

Dazzling: A dancer is seen showing off her sparkling blue knee-high boots and peacock-style head piece this morning as the Notting Hill Carnival continues

Dazzling: A dancer is seen showing off her sparkling blue knee-high boots and peacock-style head piece this morning as the Notting Hill Carnival continues

Tow male performers are seen in their outfits today, as thousands enjoy the final day of the Notting Hill Carnival

Tow male performers are seen in their outfits today, as thousands enjoy the final day of the Notting Hill Carnival

This performer today also showed off a spectacular outfit, which included orange, yellow and purple feathers

This performer today also showed off a spectacular outfit, which included orange, yellow and purple feathers

Overall, 120 officers were injured, according to the report at the time. The riots were reportedly sparked by the police’s attempt to arrest a pickpocket.

The Metropolitan Police said the most recent carnival in 2019 cost it £8.6million to police. 

The festival does however brings hundreds of thousands of tourists into London and creates an estimated £120million for the economy. 

Yesterday kicked off with members of the Emancipated Run Crew – dressed in green in tribute to those who died at Grenfell – beginning the parade and marking the official launch of Notting Hill Carnival.

Crowds of young children blowing whistles danced down the streets with their parents in tow.

New video shows moment Notting Hill revellers crashed through bus stop roof nearly CRUSHING four people beneath while separate film shows brawl break out among dancers – as police make 38 arrests including two for sexual assault

  • Two people injured after bus shelter on Ladbroke Grove gave way when revellers were dancing on top 
  • Scotland Yard says there have been 38 arrests so far including ten for assault and two for sexual assault 
  • Other arrests so far were for drug possession, criminal damage and possession of an offensive weapon
  • Arrests total in 2019 was 353, while in three years prior it was 374 in 2018, 313 in 2017 and 454 in 2016 

By Mark Duell for MailOnline 

This is the dramatic moment a bus stop collapsed during the Notting Hill Carnival after a group of revellers danced on its roof, as partygoers returned to the streets of West London for the first event since 2019.

A huge crowd watching people on top of the Kensal House bus shelter on Ladbroke Grove were heard to gasp and exclaim in shock as the top gave way and the revellers fell onto the pavement, nearly crushing four people below.

Two people suffered minor injuries but did not need further treatment after the incident, which came at the end of ‘family day’ which saw bright and dazzling costumes as the carnival procession made its way along the streets.

And Scotland Yard revealed there had been 38 arrests made by 7.30pm last night – including ten for assault, two for sexual assault and others for drug possession, criminal damage and possession of an offensive weapon.

Meanwhile one video showed two men punching each other before being pulled apart by others, after people around them were dancing and singing ‘Don’t Worry About A Thing’ to Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds. 

In addition, a police horse died on duty last night after collapsing at about 9pm. It received emergency care but died at the scene. It is too early to determine the cause of death and there will be an investigation, officers said.

The total number of arrests at the 2019 event was 353, compared to 374 in 2018, 313 in 2017 and 454 in 2016. The Metropolitan Police said the most recent carnival in 2019 cost it £8.6million to police. The festival does however brings hundreds of thousands of tourists into London and creates an estimated £120million for the economy.

Notting Hill Carnival is the largest street carnival in Europe and an estimated two million people are expected to attend over the course of the Bank Holiday weekend. The carnival first started in 1966, when about 1,000 people attended, and is a popular way for African and Caribbean communities to celebrate their culture and traditions.

The video begins with a woman dancing on top of Kensal House bus stop on Ladbroke Grove in West London yesterday

The video begins with a woman dancing on top of Kensal House bus stop on Ladbroke Grove in West London yesterday

More people then join the woman to dance or stand on top of the bus shelter during the Notting Hill Carnival yesterday

More people then join the woman to dance or stand on top of the bus shelter during the Notting Hill Carnival yesterday

The bus shelter on Ladbroke Grove in West London can be seen starting to collapse as several people walk underneath it

The bus shelter on Ladbroke Grove in West London can be seen starting to collapse as several people walk underneath it

The revellers who were on top of the shelter end up on the pavement after it collapses, prompting gasps from the crowd

The revellers who were on top of the shelter end up on the pavement after it collapses, prompting gasps from the crowd

The group of revellers were dancing on top of the bus stop on Ladbroke Grove at Notting Hill Carnival last night

The group of revellers were dancing on top of the bus stop on Ladbroke Grove at Notting Hill Carnival last night

The roof of the bus stop finally buckled and gave way under their weight as the group were sent sprawling to the floor

The roof of the bus stop finally buckled and gave way under their weight as the group were sent sprawling to the floor 

The incident caused chaos at Notting Hill Carnival in West London yesterday as festivalgoers struggled to get out of the way

The incident caused chaos at Notting Hill Carnival in West London yesterday as festivalgoers struggled to get out of the way 

Another video filmed at the Notting Hill Carnival yesterday showed two men punching each other before being pulled apart

Another video filmed at the Notting Hill Carnival yesterday showed two men punching each other before being pulled apart

Fight at Notting Hill Carnival yesterday

Fight at Notting Hill Carnival yesterday

Yesterday’s fight came after people were dancing and singing ‘Don’t Worry About A Thing’ to Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds

Yesterday kicked off with members of the Emancipated Run Crew – dressed in green in tribute to those who died at Grenfell – beginning the parade and marking the official launch of Notting Hill Carnival.

Crowds of young children blowing whistles danced down the streets with their parents in tow. 

Notting Hill Carnival arrests so far this year

Scotland Yard said that as of 7.30pm last night, officers had made 38 arrests for the following offences:

  • 5 x possession of drugs
  • 2 x criminal damage
  • 6 x public order
  • 10 x assault
  • 2 x sexual assault
  • 3 x possession of psychoactive substances
  • 5 x possession of an offensive weapon
  • 1 x drink/drug driving
  • 1 x theft
  • 3 x other

Co-founder of the club Jules Stephenson said: ‘It (the atmosphere) is electric – everyone is so excited about carnival being back.’

The two-day festival has had a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic. 

Elsewhere, Carina Charles, 40, a nurse from Basildon, said: ‘I like the togetherness of the people and the mixture of the culture. 

‘My Caribbean music, the soca music is what I love the most. Everybody is jovial – they are excited after coming out of lockdown after three years.’

Different sound systems dotted around the streets of West London entertained the dancing crowds as revellers smiled to the booming music.

Small children standing on the doorsteps of their houses waved Jamaican flags and waved at passers-by.

Shauna Walsh, 38, who lives in Kensal Rise, said: ‘The atmosphere has been really uplifting and warming – it is nice to be back.’

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said: ‘As a Londoner I’m really pleased carnival is back.’

He said carnival was celebrating Caribbean culture, heritage, and history and there was a ‘pent up’ demand for festivities this year.

He added: ‘We think it’s going to be the biggest and best ever.’

But Mr Khan also warned the cost-of-living crisis had affected the carnival.

Police lead a man to a police van at the end of the day during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night

Police lead a man to a police van at the end of the day during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night 

Police carry a person on a fabric stretcher through the street at the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night

Police carry a person on a fabric stretcher through the street at the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night

Police patrol during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night after it returned following two years off

Police patrol during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night after it returned following two years off

Carnival-goers at the Notting Hill Carnival in London last night which is back for the first time since 2019

Carnival-goers at the Notting Hill Carnival in London last night which is back for the first time since 2019

Police patrol during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night as people gathered to celebrate the festival

Police patrol during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night as people gathered to celebrate the festival

Police stand by huge amounts of rubbish during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night

Police stand by huge amounts of rubbish during the Notting Hill Carnival in West London last night

Rubbish from Notting Hill Carnival stacked up ready to be cleared in front of boarded-up properties last night

Rubbish from Notting Hill Carnival stacked up ready to be cleared in front of boarded-up properties last night

Three young women walk wrapped in flags during the family day at the Notting Hill Carnival in London last night

Three young women walk wrapped in flags during the family day at the Notting Hill Carnival in London last night

Rubbish from Notting Hill Carnival in West London are cleared last night ahead of the festival restarting this morning

Rubbish from Notting Hill Carnival in West London are cleared last night ahead of the festival restarting this morning 

Thousands of people attended the Notting Hill Carnival yesterday, which has not been held since 2019 due to the pandemic

Thousands of people attended the Notting Hill Carnival yesterday, which has not been held since 2019 due to the pandemic

Dancers in the procession yesterday wore bright costumes with elaborate headdresses plumed with bird feathers

Dancers in the procession yesterday wore bright costumes with elaborate headdresses plumed with bird feathers

Festival goers celebrated the Notting Hill Carnival during yesterday's procession through West London

Festival goers celebrated the Notting Hill Carnival during yesterday’s procession through West London

A reveller dances next to a police officer at the Notting Hill Carnival in London yesterday

A reveller dances next to a police officer at the Notting Hill Carnival in London yesterday

Large crowds enjoy the music yesterday as Notting Hill Carnival returned after the Covid hiatus

Large crowds enjoy the music yesterday as Notting Hill Carnival returned after the Covid hiatus

The carnival is normally an annual event on the streets of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (pictured yesterday)

The carnival is normally an annual event on the streets of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (pictured yesterday)

He said: ‘We are seeing those who want to have floats, those who want to have sound systems, pulling out because they can’t afford to pay their bills.’

Farah Mokaddem, 32, travelled from Geneva to attend Notting Hill Carnival this year. She said: ‘I always wanted to go here.’

She added: ‘The atmosphere is very animated: everyone is on their balconies and on the terrace. And people of all ages are watching as people go past.’

Paul Wright, 36, an account manager from Ealing, said: ‘There’s a great atmosphere, everyone seems to be having a good time. I think there’s more people here for a good time rather than any incidents.’

He added that it was a ‘nice thing’ where everyone came together and had a nice time. Mr Wright joked: ‘The weather can always be better.’

How the Notting Hill Carnival brought a fractured community together after racist murder: Pioneering activist planted the seeds for six decades of world-famous festival after inviting BBC to film her Caribbean party in St Pancras Town Hall in 1959

  • The Notting Hill Carnival has its roots in indoor celebration organised by Trinidadian Claudia Jones
  • The Caribbean Carnival was held in St Pancras Town Hall in 1959 in response to difficult race relations
  • That year, aspiring lawyer Kelso Cochrane was murdered by a gang of white youths
  • Prompted activist Rhaune Laslett to organise children’s fayre that became first outdoor carnival in 1966 

By Harry Howard, History Correspondent for MailOnline

Published on August 26 

The streets of West London will be filled with the noise, colour and joy of the Notting Hill carnival for the first time in three years this weekend.

From Notting Hill Gate to Ladbroke Grove, thousands of people will flood the streets to enjoy the blasts of sound systems and parades of dancers and drummers. 

Whilst the two-day event has been celebrated in its outdoor form since 1966, it has its roots in an indoor celebration organised by Trinidadian communist Claudia Jones, who has since become known as the ‘mother of the Notting Hill Carnival’. 

The Caribbean Carnival, which was held in St Pancras Town Hall in 1959 and then every year until 1966, was organised by Jones in response to difficult race relations in the aftermath of the Notting Hill race riots of 1958. 

These protests played out amid the arrival in England of members of the ‘Windrush’ generation. 

They were the thousands from Caribbean countries who came to Britain between 1948 and 1971 and were met by some with hostility. 

Jones, who had spent 30 years in the US fighting for racial justice before being deported to Britain in 1955 after being declared ‘un-American’, organised the indoor event in the hope of bringing communities together. 

Televised by the BBC, it included dancing, music and a beauty pageant. Stunning photos show Jones herself and hundreds of other enjoying themselves at the event. 

Four months after the first Caribbean Carnival, the black aspiring lawyer Kelso Cochrane, who was from Antigua, died after being attacked by racists in Notting Hill. 

His murder, which remains unsolved, spurred on another activist – Rhaune Laslett – to organise a children’s street fayre that ended up being the first outdoor carnival in 1966 when the popular Russ Henderson Steel Band got involved.  

With the first event a huge success, it has been held every year since then – bar in 2020 and 2021 due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. 

But the carnival has also been marred by clashes between revellers and police, with particularly brutal clashes coming in 1976. Five people have lost their lives in shootings and stabbings at or around the carnival since 1987. 

Whilst the two-day Notting Hill Carnival has been celebrated in its outdoor form since 1966, it has its roots in an indoor celebration organised by Trinidadian communist Claudia Jones, who has since become known as the 'mother of the Notting Hill Carnival'. Above: Jones is pictured dancing at the Caribbean Carnival inside St Pancras town hall in 1959

Whilst the two-day Notting Hill Carnival has been celebrated in its outdoor form since 1966, it has its roots in an indoor celebration organised by Trinidadian communist Claudia Jones, who has since become known as the ‘mother of the Notting Hill Carnival’. Above: Jones is pictured dancing at the Caribbean Carnival inside St Pancras town hall in 1959

The Caribbean Carnival was organised by Jones in response to difficult race relations in the aftermath of the Notting Hill race riots of 1958. Above: Revellers dancing at the event

The Caribbean Carnival was organised by Jones in response to difficult race relations in the aftermath of the Notting Hill race riots of 1958. Above: Revellers dancing at the event

The Notting Hill Carnival has proved to be one of the most popular annual events in the country for decades. Above: Revellers at the 1994 carnival

The Notting Hill Carnival has proved to be one of the most popular annual events in the country for decades. Above: Revellers at the 1994 carnival

Dancers are seen parading during the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival, which was the last event before the coronavirus pandemic saw it cancelled in 2020 and last year

Dancers are seen parading during the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival, which was the last event before the coronavirus pandemic saw it cancelled in 2020 and last year 

Sound systems make their way down Ladbroke Grove amid huge crowds of people at the Notting Hill Carnival in 2019

Sound systems make their way down Ladbroke Grove amid huge crowds of people at the Notting Hill Carnival in 2019

Born in 1915, Jones went first to the US, where she joined the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and then the American Communist Party.

As a result of her activism, she was arrested and sent to the UK because she was a ‘subject of the British Empire.

Four months after the first Caribbean Carnival, the black aspiring lawyer Kelso Cochrane (pictured), who was from Antigua, died after being attacked by racists in Notting Hill

Four months after the first Caribbean Carnival, the black aspiring lawyer Kelso Cochrane (pictured), who was from Antigua, died after being attacked by racists in Notting Hill

Once in the UK, she founded the influential newspaper the West Indian Gazette, which became a mouthpiece for what was then a 100,000-strong Caribbean community in London.

The riots of 1958 were caused in part by the tension stoked by fascist Oswald Mosley’s White Defence League, whose members attacked London’s black community. 

The upheaval in Notting Hill lasted for five nights, with dozens left injured. It prompted Jones to use the medium of dance to try to tackle racial hatred. 

Her Caribbean Carnival was held for six more years after the 1959 event. It proved to be a salve for a community wracked by racial tension. 

Cochrane was living in Notting Hill during the time of high racial tension and was working as a carpenter. He was murdered on Notting Hill’s Golborne Road on May 17, 1959. 

A blue plaque now marks the spot where he lost his life. The carpenter was stabbed by a gang of white men as he walked home from hospital, where he had been after being injured in a work accident. 

Cochrane’s murder was greeted with outrage among the black community, some of whom marched down Whitehall holding protest banners.

Rab Butler, the then Home Secretary, made an appeal in Parliament for witnesses to come forward, and set up a public inquiry into race relations. However, no one was ever brought to justice for his killing. 

The murder prompted activist Laslett to organise the outdoor event in 1966, following Jones’ death the year before. 

She is reported to have said later: ‘We felt that although West Indians, Africans, Irish and many others nationalities all live in a very congested area, there is very little communication between us. 

The race riots of 1958 occurred amid the arrival in England of members of the 'Windrush' generation. They were the thousands from Caribbean countries who came to Britain between 1948 and 1971 and were met by some with hostility. Above: Police are seen questioning people outside a restaurant during the riots

The race riots of 1958 occurred amid the arrival in England of members of the ‘Windrush’ generation. They were the thousands from Caribbean countries who came to Britain between 1948 and 1971 and were met by some with hostility. Above: Police are seen questioning people outside a restaurant during the riots

Scenes in and around Bramley Road in Notting Hill, where police were called to prevent trouble between black and white residents in the area during the race riots in 1958

Scenes in and around Bramley Road in Notting Hill, where police were called to prevent trouble between black and white residents in the area during the race riots in 1958

‘If we can infect them with a desire to participate, then this can only have good results.’

Laslett invited the popular pan player Russell Henderson to perform with his band members. They had been regulars at Jones’s indoor carnivals. 

In the 1966 event, Henderson’s band waved its way through Portobello Road, as locals gathered and danced.

The popularity of the carnival continued to increase during the 1970s. By 1976, there were 150,000 people attending. 

The numbers were boosted thanks to the work of Leslie Palmer, who was the carnival’s organiser from 1973 until 1975. 

He organised sponsorship, recruited more bands and also installed multiple static sound systems, which have remained a standout feature of the event.

Jones (pictured above in 1948) had spent 30 years in the US fighting for racial justice before being deported to Britain in 1955 after being declared 'un-American'

Jones (pictured above in 1948) had spent 30 years in the US fighting for racial justice before being deported to Britain in 1955 after being declared ‘un-American’

The 1959 indoor carnival proved to be a salve for a community wracked by racial tension. Above: Attendees at the event

The 1959 indoor carnival proved to be a salve for a community wracked by racial tension. Above: Attendees at the event

A policeman is seen joining a colourful parade during the Notting Hill Carnival in 1984. The event is hugely popular

A policeman is seen joining a colourful parade during the Notting Hill Carnival in 1984. The event is hugely popular

Revellers are seen enjoying themselves during the 1974 Notting Hill Carnival. This man opted for an elaborate head piece

Revellers are seen enjoying themselves during the 1974 Notting Hill Carnival. This man opted for an elaborate head piece

A float carrying a giant 50 pence piece featuring a man sitting in the style of the Queen is seen during the 1978 carnival

A float carrying a giant 50 pence piece featuring a man sitting in the style of the Queen is seen during the 1978 carnival 

Festivalgoers and performers parading under police supervision at the Notting Hill Carnival, London, August 26, 1980

Festivalgoers and performers parading under police supervision at the Notting Hill Carnival, London, August 26, 1980

Young men are seen dancing on the pavement during the Notting Hill Carnival in 1990

Young men are seen dancing on the pavement during the Notting Hill Carnival in 1990

Revllers are seen at the Notting Hill Carnival in 1972. The popularity of the carnival continued to increase during the 1970s. By 1976, there were 150,000 people attending

Revllers are seen at the Notting Hill Carnival in 1972. The popularity of the carnival continued to increase during the 1970s. By 1976, there were 150,000 people attending

A young boy is seen sitting on a police officer's shoulders during the Notting Hill Carnival in 1988

A young boy is seen sitting on a police officer’s shoulders during the Notting Hill Carnival in 1988

The vibrant colours of the Notting Hill Carnival are seen on display during the 1998 event, as hundreds of revellers line up to watch

The vibrant colours of the Notting Hill Carnival are seen on display during the 1998 event, as hundreds of revellers line up to watch

The 1970s did also see significant clashes with police, most famously in 1976, when the Daily Mail proclaimed on its front page: ‘Battle at the Carnival’. 

There were dozens of arrests as stones, beer cans and bottles were hurled at police. Hundreds more officers had to be drafted in to reinforce the 1,000 who were originally on duty. 

Overall, 120 officers were injured, according to the report at the time. The riots were reportedly sparked by the police’s attempt to arrest a pickpocket. 

In 2016, there were more than 450 arrests at the carnival, whilst five people were hurt in knife attacks. 

The 1970s did also see significant clashes with police, most famously in 1976, when the Daily Mail proclaimed on its front page: 'Battle at the Carnival'

The 1970s did also see significant clashes with police, most famously in 1976, when the Daily Mail proclaimed on its front page: ‘Battle at the Carnival’

There were dozens of arrests as stones, beer cans and bottles were hurled at police. Hundreds more officers had to be drafted in to reinforce the 1,000 who were originally on duty

There were dozens of arrests as stones, beer cans and bottles were hurled at police. Hundreds more officers had to be drafted in to reinforce the 1,000 who were originally on duty

Police are seen lined up with riot shields as they coped with unrest during the 1976 Notting Hill Carnival

Police are seen lined up with riot shields as they coped with unrest during the 1976 Notting Hill Carnival

More than 100 people were arrested at the most recent carnival, in 2019.

In recent years, around one million revellers are estimated to have attended. Musicians who have performed at the carnival include Jay Z, Stormzy, Craig David and Stefflon Don.

The carnival was cancelled last year for the second year in a row due to the ‘ongoing uncertainty and risk’ of coronavirus, organisers said. 

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