PIERS MORGAN: I get no satisfaction from seeing the Stones surrender to the awakened brigade

When the Rolling Stones appeared on the Ed Sullivan show in 1967, singer Mick Jagger changed the words of their big hit “Let’s Spend The Night Together” to “Let’s Spend Some Time Together.”

This was because the original sex hint text was deemed too offensive for ultra-conservative American TV viewers to bear.

It was even reported that Puritan host Sullivan told the band, “Either the song goes, or you go” before agreeing to change the line.

In the end, Jagger censored himself — the Sullivan show sold more records than anything on TV at the time — but rolled his eyes scathing as he sang the new formulation.

This all seems incredible now, doesn’t it?

In an age where rap lyrics are not only full of hardcore sexual content, but also despicable misogyny, sexism, homophobia, rape fantasies and violence, including pleas to kill the police, such concern over something so relatively tame seems laughable.

In an age where rap lyrics are not only full of hardcore sexual content, but also despicable misogyny, sexism, homophobia, rape fantasies and violence, including pleas to kill the police, such concern over something so relatively tame seems laughable.

But it’s now been revealed that the Stones have stopped performing one of their biggest hits ever, Brown Sugar, over complaints that it’s also unacceptably offensive.

This is a big problem.

The 1969 song was a regular part of their live shows around the world at least 1,136 times.

In fact, it is the second most played song in the entire Rolling Stones catalog, after Jumpin’ Jack Flash.

But not anymore.

When asked this week by the Los Angeles Times why they hadn’t played the song on their new tour, Jagger made it all sound completely innocent, replying, “We’ve been playing ‘Brown Sugar’ every night since 1970, so sometimes you think, we’ll take it out for a while and see how it goes. We might be able to put it back in.”

But it was clear from the response of Jagger’s bandmate Keith Richards, who co-wrote Brown Sugar, that this was not an accidental decision and was in fact made after complaints that the lyrics were offensive because they refer to slavery and are therefore racist.

Richards was stunned at the resistance.

“I’m trying to figure out where the beef is with the sisters,” said the 77-year-old guitar legend. “Didn’t they understand that this was a song about the horrors of slavery? But they’re trying to bury it.’

The 1969 song was a regular part of their live shows around the world at least 1,136 times.

The 1969 song was a regular part of their live shows around the world at least 1,136 times.

Then, in words of surrender that made my skin tickle from a man who has never submitted to anyone about anything, he added, “Right now I don’t want to get into conflict with all this shit. But I hope we can bring the baby back to life in its glory somewhere along the track.”

Really, Keith?

You no longer have the guts to stand up for yourself and fight for what’s right?

You were the man who co-wrote Street Fighting Man for God’s sake!

How deeply depressing.

Given this cowardly climb down, let me plead for the defense on behalf of the Stones: there’s nothing racist about Brown Sugar.

It’s a song, as Richards says, that emphasizes the horrific historical reality of slavery, not one that celebrates it.

It depicts female slaves being sold, beaten and raped in the Americas.

Most people know and understand this, not least the two men who wrote it in the first place and who championed the famous black music artists more than any band in history.

In fact, according to Bill Wyman, the song was inspired by a black backing singer named Claudia Linnear, who was Jagger’s girlfriend when he wrote the song and who did a 1974 photo shoot for “Playboy” magazine titled “Brown Sugar.”

Given this cowardly climb down, let me plead for the defense on behalf of the Stones: there's nothing racist about Brown Sugar.

Given this cowardly climb down, let me plead for the defense on behalf of the Stones: there’s nothing racist about Brown Sugar.

Though another ex of Jagger, a black woman named Martha Hunt, later claimed it was about her.

Whatever the truth, Brown Sugar is arguably a song aimed at defending and supporting black women, not one that aims to denigrate them or downplay slavery.

But the awakening fueled narrative will now be that the song IS racist, so the Stones are racist for that reason, and they’ve stopped performing it because they accept these claims.

What total nonsense.

As with so many of these awakened campaigns, I think it will backfire greatly.

Most reasonable people do not share this incessant hysterical desire to cancel everything and everyone that is even vaguely controversial or ‘problematic’.

When “Baby It’s Cold Outside” was banned a few years ago, in the maelstrom of the #MeToo movement, because it supposedly promoted sexual violence – which it doesn’t – and “Saint” John Legend pathetically rewrote the lyrics to make the world To suck equally annoying virtue signallers, the audience reacted as I hoped they would and sent the song roaring back to the top of the charts.

Just like when Gillette gave up their pro-men branding to suddenly make all men feel ashamed of being men, their sales plummeted.

As a result, I now predict with confidence that Brown Sugar will be bought in large numbers because of this crazy ‘ban’ and that the Stones will start performing it again soon due to huge public demand.

But there is a bigger picture here and it involves the ridiculous double standard applied to what is acceptable in music lyrics.

No one dares to go after rappers for fear that they would be considered “racist”.

But ironically, many of the lyrics by rappers themselves are horribly racist.

Grow a few, Mick (no apologies for any wokies offended by this phrase), stand up to the waking bullies and sing Brown Sugar loud and proud during the rest of your shows.

Grow a few, Mick (no apologies for any wokies offended by this phrase), stand up to the waking bullies and sing Brown Sugar loud and proud during the rest of your shows.

After the death of a teenager at the hands of a Korean shop assistant in 1991, Ice Cube released a song called Black Korea that contained these lyrics: “So don’t follow me up and down your market/ Or your little chop-suey ass will be a target / From the rural boycott / Juice with the people, that’s what the boy got / So respect the black fist / Or we burn your shop to a crispy / And then we’ll see you / Cause you can’t turn the ghetto into Black Korea.’

The lyrics remain uncensored or edited.

Rappers also spew incredibly insulting lyrics about women.

Snoop Dogg sang: ‘B*itches ain’t sh*t but hoes and tricks, lick these nuts and suck the dick.’

Kanye West sang, “I know she likes chocolate men, she got more niggers than Cochran.”

Eminem sang, “Slut, you don’t think I’m going to choke a whore until the vocal cords stop working in her throat.”

And as for Pharrell Williams’ Blurred Lines collaboration with Robin Thicke, he has since admitted that the lyrics, including “I hate these blur lines, I know you want it,” were “rapey.”

Where are the awakened campaigns against these guys?

It’s very disappointing to see Mick Jagger of all people bow to the PC crowd like that.

He made no secret of his mockery in 1967 when he was commissioned to censor Ed Sullivan’s “Let’s Spend The Night Together.”

But now he capitulates in a much worse way.

The whole point of the Stones was that they defiantly pushed boundaries and challenged conventional thinking, and didn’t act like timid little freaks every time someone sobbed, “Boo-hoo, I’m so offended.”

Grow a few, Mick (no apologies for any wokies offended by this phrase), stand up to the waking bullies and sing Brown Sugar loud and proud during the rest of your shows.

Or shelter me from the satisfaction you have given the awake brigade chanting ‘Under My Thumb’ over you today.

This may be the new rock’n’roll, but I don’t like it.

.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button