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Planning major sporting events is SEKIST, study claims

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From England’s victory at the Women’s European Championship to the first-ever female offshoot of the Tour de France, 2022 has undoubtedly been a landmark year for women’s sport.

But a new study claims the scheduling of many of these events is sexist.

Researchers from the University of Technology, Sydney, say the women’s finals are treated as “warm-up events” for the men.

This, they claim, sends the message that women are second-rate athletes.

“It’s time to challenge the gender hierarchy in sport and demonstrate explicitly and with pride that the achievements of female athletes are valued just as much as that of male athletes,” the team said.

Researchers from the University of Technology, Sydney, say the women’s finals are treated as “warm-up events” for the men. In the photo: Elena Rybakina celebrates her win at Wimbledon

Male titles are SEXISTIC and undermine women’s role as leaders in the workplace, study claims

From chairman to salesperson, many job titles usually include the word “man.”

A study now claims that these quintessentially masculine titles are sexist and undermine women’s role as leaders in the workplace.

Researchers at the University of Houston found that the title of president increases the assumptions that a leader is male more than the title of president.

Allison MN Archer, who led the study, said: “While some dismiss gender-neutral titles as “political correctness,” this research suggests that implicit sexist language in male titles reinforces stereotypes that link masculinity to leadership and, consequently, weaken the bond between women and leadership. .’

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Significant progress has been made in many women’s sports in recent years, according to the researchers.

Sports traditionally thought to be male-only, such as soccer and pole vault, now feature women, while all four tennis Grand Slam tournaments now offer the same prize money to male and female players.

However, female athletes are still fighting for equality in other aspects of sports, they say.

“Structural barriers are ubiquitous, such as sexist uniform mandates, rules forcing women to choose between breastfeeding and competition, sexual harassment and inappropriateness against female athletes, and lower representation of women in sports governance, coaching and journalism,” they wrote in their study. published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Another major obstacle that many female athletes face is the planning of their events, according to the team.

They call the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, where the women’s final has always been held before the men’s.

“Before Tokyo 2020, this scheduling bias was significant with the Olympics,” they wrote.

“For example, the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games featured 25 hours of competition for men’s matches on the last Sunday (primary airing time), but only 2 hours for women’s events.

“In most previous Olympics and almost all other sporting events where men and women compete together, such as tennis, table tennis and beach volleyball, the last two events are the finals for women and men – in that order.

During the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, 25 hours of competition were scheduled for men's matches on the last Sunday (primary broadcasting time), but only 2 hours for women's events. Team GB rider Mo Farah pictured after completing the 'double double' in Rio 2016

During the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, 25 hours of competition were scheduled for men’s matches on the last Sunday (primary broadcasting time), but only 2 hours for women’s events. Team GB rider Mo Farah pictured after completing the ‘double double’ in Rio 2016

Women are just as competitive as men, study shows

Women are just as competitive as men, according to a study that found they compete at the same pace as men, but are more likely to share their winnings.

By placing volunteers in groups and asking them to solve a series of math problems in exchange for a reward, researchers at the University of Arizona in Tucson were able to study gender differences in relation to competition.

The 238 entrants were evenly split between men and women and had the option of choosing a guaranteed prize for a correct result, a larger prize if they were a top performer, or a larger prize with the option to share the profit with the winner. losers.

Given the chance to share their winnings, 60 percent of women chose to compete, while only 35 percent decided to join if they won the lottery ticket.

In contrast, 51 percent of men chose the winner-take-all option, compared to 52.5 percent of men who went for gold if they could share their reward with the losers.

Researchers say female participants may be more interested in controlling how the profits are distributed among the other participants than the males.

“This perpetuates a gender hierarchy in which the women’s final is seen as the ‘warm-up’ to the supposed pinnacle of the competition, the men’s final.”

The researchers believe this planning bias could have a knock-on effect for girls and women around the world.

“Not only do these obstacles keep women athletes from reaching their full potential and being celebrated as the pinnacle of their sport, but they can also keep girls and women around the world from embracing sport and enjoying the full benefits of a sport.” active lifestyle,” they added.

Worldwide, women are less physically active than men. Studies show that in the UK, only 12 percent of girls aged 14 meet official physical activity guidelines.

Based on the findings, the researchers argue for ‘a small, but potentially impactful change’.

“We call on the International Olympic Committee and all major sports federations around the world that organize events in which both men and women participate, such as tennis, to alternate the order of the men’s and women’s finals between tournaments,” they propose. .

“Broadcasting rights are an important source of income for major sporting events and, as mentioned earlier, women’s sports generally receive much less media attention than men’s sports.

“We argue that our proposed change is unlikely to impact overall viewership.

“For example, if we take Grand Slam tennis tournaments, on consecutive days (usually both weekend days) broadcasters usually broadcast both the women’s and men’s finals live at the same time of day.

“Our proposal does not involve adding, subtracting or substitution of coverage, just to alternate the order of these finals between tournaments, which may have minimal impact on viewers.”

While it remains unclear whether these changes are being considered, the researchers say “any progress” is significant.

“Any progress is significant if it leads to more girls and women around the world engaging in physical activity and sport to unleash their full potential on and off the sports field,” they concluded.

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