Police leading search for William Tyrrell’s remains say they are ‘very happy’ with progress

NSW Police said they are “very happy” with the search for William Tyrrell’s remains as it was announced that the operation will be extended due to inclement weather.

During an update Friday morning, Detective Chief Superintendent Darren Bennett said the search could be doubled from the original 2-3 week period, but enough material had been found to justify the extension.

The information was provided as the search for the three-year-old entered its 12th day.

“It’s clear to all of us that we couldn’t have picked the worst time weather wise,” said Det Chief Super Bennett.

“Since we started, the weather has been pretty much horrendous. The coroner has been kept informed of our progress.

“It’s painstaking, it’s difficult. We’re very happy with the progress so far and we’re very comfortable with where we are, but there isn’t a great milestone to report today, other than the quest may expand beyond our original time frame.”

‘numerous [items] have been seized that have been forensically advanced… and the progress of those results has been submitted to the coroner to aid in the investigation.”

Det Chief Super Bennett said he was confident the police operation would gather enough evidence to allow the coroner’s investigation to proceed.

“I am confident that the Strike Force (Rosann) will gather a body of evidence and information to report to the coroner, to proceed with the investigation, and the coroner will handle that information as they see fit.” eight,” he said.

“We don’t know what happened to William Tyrrell as we stand here.”

A police diver searches a dam for any trace of missing three-year-old William Tyrrell

This dam, which is about a kilometer from William's foster grandmother's house, is said to have been searched during the first hunt when he disappeared

This dam, which is about a kilometer from William’s foster grandmother’s house, is said to have been searched during the first hunt when he disappeared

Two police divers emerge from the water after a search for a dam in Kendall on the north coast of NSW

Two police divers emerge from the water after a search for a dam in Kendall on the north coast of NSW

Police search one of the digs at Batar Creek Road near the Kendall estate where William disappeared in September 2014

Police search one of the digs at Batar Creek Road near the Kendall estate where William disappeared in September 2014

The boy disappeared from his foster grandmother’s home in Kendall on the north coast of NSW in September 2014.

Yesterday, police divers searched a dam for traces of the missing boy.

Police searched extensively around the house and nearby bushland, and endured a week of continuous rain.

Forensic anthropologist Penny McCardle arrived at the dam’s edge shortly after yesterday’s dive began checking as the men bobbed in the water.

This dam, which is about a kilometer from William’s foster grandmother’s house, is said to have been searched during the first hunt when he disappeared.

The water leads to a creek where police found three items that had been bagged and sent for forensic examination on Tuesday.

Specialized agents first arrived at the Batar Creek Road excavation site Wednesday afternoon, where they inspected a stormwater tank near the home where William was last seen.

A GoPro-style camera mounted on a pole was lowered into the tank to film what was inside, while a group of officers watched through a surveillance screen.

A day after she was appointed the next commissioner, Ms Webb said the team of 30 police officers involved in the search were joined on Wednesday by specialized police divers, who inspected a septic tank and a water tank on the Kendall property.

The divers donned wetsuits and scuba gear on Thursday to search a small dam.

The search continued as the incoming NSW Police Commissioner promised ‘we are not going to give up’.

“We need to find William and sort this out,” Deputy Commissioner Karen Webb said.

Ms. Webb says she is sure there will be a result in the case, but it will take time.

“It has been a long and arduous search and it is clear that the weather conditions there are unfavorable at the moment, but the police will pursue that no matter what,” she told Sydney Radio 2GB on Thursday.

“I am convinced that this team will continue to pursue this until we have a result.

“We have to find William and fix this.”

Specialized agents inspected a stormwater tank at the former foster grandmother's home where William was last seen

Specialized agents inspected a stormwater tank at the former foster grandmother’s home where William was last seen

Police are seen on the 11th day of the search for any remains of the boy near the Kendall grounds

Police are seen on the 11th day of the search for any remains of the boy near the Kendall grounds

Hydrologist Professor Jon Olley (left) talks to police as the sodden search continues

Hydrologist Professor Jon Olley (left) talks to police as the sodden search continues

As a result of the new search, more than 15 tons of soil have been taken to a lab for forensic analysis

As a result of the new search, more than 15 tons of soil have been taken to a lab for forensic analysis

More than 15 tons of soil have been taken to a lab for analysis, but Ms Webb said she was unaware of the DNA detection.

“There has been miles and miles of material and many exhibits created that will be explored, but that takes time.”

The search is expected to continue for at least four weeks.

New information sparked a renewed police search, and they’ve been digging and sifting through the ground at three locations along Batar Creek Road over the past 10 days.

Last week, police also revealed they were investigating whether William had fallen from the balcony of his foster grandmother’s home to his death.

A specially trained cadaver dog was deployed to search for evidence under the house, the garden bed was excavated and a concrete slab laid in the garage of the house was examined by the Australian Federal Police using a ground-penetrating scanner.

The AFP’s Forensic Imagery and Geometrics team examined any anomalies beneath the slab by bouncing an image from the machine’s radar.

The search for William Tyrrell's remains is expected to continue for at least four weeks

The search for William Tyrrell’s remains is expected to continue for at least four weeks

Last week, police also revealed they were investigating whether William had fallen to his death from the balcony of his foster grandmother's home (pictured).

Last week, police also revealed they were investigating whether William had fallen to his death from the balcony of his foster grandmother’s home (pictured).

One of the sites police have also excavated was once a handicapped riding school that the little boy’s foster mother drove to the morning he disappeared.

She told police she was driving down Batar Creek Road looking for William on the morning he disappeared and stopped at the riding school to let a car pass behind her and take a moment to make sure he wasn’t in the neighborhood.

William was playing with his sister at his foster grandmother’s house and was wearing a Spiderman suit at the time of his disappearance in September 2014.

For seven years it was believed that William had been kidnapped from the property, but on November 15, after receiving new evidence, NSW Police began a new search of the Kendall grounds and surrounding area for what are believed to be the boy’s remains. goods.

.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button