Privileged Sydney Knox Grammar Schoolboy FINALLY Punished As Football Coach Dumped By Northern Tigers

Former private school thug Nick Drummond finally pays a price for his ‘terrible’ violent behavior after a court released him despite admitting his guilt.

Drummond, 20, labeled a young woman a ‘s**t’ at a bar and told her to ‘get rid of her tits’ before later punching her in the face and telling her to ‘rot.’

That same night last December, he also hit a random stranger on the back of the head outside a bar.

But the former Knox Grammar student escaped without punishment or conviction when he appeared in court earlier this week, sparking a furious backlash.

Now the promising soccer star and junior soccer coach has been dumped by his soccer club after they were disgusted by reports of his behaviour.

And the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions has revealed that they are also reviewing the ruling in his case to appeal.

Ex private school thug Nick Drummond (seen here with his mother Linda) finally pays a price for his ‘terrible’ violent behavior after a court released him despite admitting his guilt

Drummond, 20, branded a young woman a 'sl*t' in a bar and told her to 'put her t*** away' before later punching her in the face and saying 'f*** off'.  (Pictured, the woman later revealed her outfit the night she was attacked, as seen here)

Drummond, 20, branded a young woman a ‘sl*t’ in a bar and told her to ‘put her t*** away’ before later punching her in the face and saying ‘f*** off’. (Pictured, the woman later revealed her outfit the night she was attacked, as seen here)

Drummond played for both the U20 and senior men’s NPL2 side for Northern Tigers as an attacking midfielder where he impressed on the pitch.

But on Thursday, the club fired Drummond, from Wahroonga in Sydney’s wealthy north coast, after reading reports of his behaviour.

“We are extremely disappointed and do not approve of Mr Drummond’s behaviour,” said club boss Edward Ferguson.

“In line with our club values ​​and culture, we have a zero-tolerance policy for these types of incidents.”

Nick Drummond (pictured) got away with punching a woman in the face and was back at work as a junior football coach on Wednesday. He has now been dumped by his football club

The Public Prosecutor’s Office officer also told Daily Mail Australia that he is considering reopening his case following the outraged response to Judge Richard Sutherland’s decision not to include a conviction.

“The Bureau is currently considering the Court’s ruling,” said a spokesman.

“There are only limited appeals for the prosecution against these kinds of hearings.”

Nick Drummond (front center, with his family in 2013 including mother Linda and father David) and his twin sister are the youngest in the family, with two older sisters and a brother

Nick Drummond (front center, with his family in 2013 including mother Linda and father David) and his twin sister are the youngest in the family, with two older sisters and a brother

Promising future footballer Nick Drummond (pictured) finally pays a price for his 'terrible' criminal behavior

Promising future footballer Nick Drummond (pictured) finally pays a price for his ‘terrible’ criminal behavior

The move comes in the wake of growing public anger at the leniency shown to the ex-private schoolboy and the judge’s comments.

The judge said the incidents were fueled by Drummond’s “loose tongue and loose thoughts” and excessive alcohol consumption.

Judge Robert Sutherland added: “[He made] a lewd and utterly inappropriate remark to someone he didn’t know, but whose dress might have been perceived as provocative by a former student of Knox’s.’

The verdict and comments sparked outrage after the budding star and children’s soccer coach insisted that his role as a mentor to children would be called into question if convicted of the attacks.

On Wednesday, Drummond – who has a twin sister and two older sisters and a brother – was again training kids at a soccer field in Roseville on Sydney’s affluent North Shore.

His former club Northern Tigers – based in Turramurra – also have a women’s team and the Australian Women in Football group convicted Drummond for his violence.

“Both Football NSW and his club must now impose sanctions on him,” a spokesman said Wednesday ahead of the club’s decision.

“The behavior is appalling, exacerbated by a judge’s comments.

Nick Drummond, 20, (pictured) told his victim to ‘put her t*** away’ before later punching her in the face and a coward punching a random stranger on the back of the head outside a bar

“Football must not tolerate it – and show that it is not tolerated – among its players or junior coaches.”

Drummond’s female victim, who agreed to release an image of the outfit she was wearing when she was attacked, said the public’s response was “overwhelming.”

“All the writers and campaigners who have shown an overwhelming amount of support made me feel like some kind of justice had been served because it was clear I was not alone,” said the woman, who wished to remain anonymous.

“Everyone is just shocked and disappointed by (the court ruling).

“Everyone has the same view.”

She repeatedly confronted Drummond, including when they ran into each other in another pub that night and she photographed him.

A melee over the phone ensued, which resulted in him being ejected and then hitting a stranger in the head who was queuing up to enter Chatswood’s Orchard Hotel.

Campaigner Chanel Costos shared this image of what the woman was wearing the night Drummond hit her

Campaigner Chanel Costos shared this image of what the woman was wearing the night Drummond hit her

He then hit the woman as she approached him again on her way to the train station.

Drummond pleaded guilty to assault and told the court, “I was raised better and I know better…I know that violence is not the answer, especially against women.”

As a junior football coach, he feared a criminal conviction would cost him his Working With Children’s Check, while his lawyer called Drummond’s “very difficult” 2020, including the death of a family dog, a broken relationship and family illness.

Former Kambala student Chanel Costos, 22, (pictured) started a petition in February calling for 'sexual consent education' in boys' schools

Former Kambala student Chanel Costos, 22, (pictured) started a petition in February calling for ‘sexual consent education’ in boys’ schools

Prosecutors opposed the appeal, but Judge Robert Sutherland acknowledged Drummond’s offense was an aberration and did not find convictions “necessary” in all circumstances.

He has again issued a 14-month good behavior bond.

Chanel Contos, champion of consent education, said the story was a reminder of “the injustice that happens in our legal system and the violence that men commit every day.”

“It tells us that privileges and rights are not only why gender-based violence occurs, but also why there is no accountability,” said the founder of Teach Us Consent.

The young woman said she spoke to the other victim of Drummond's unprovoked attacks at the Greengate Hotel (pictured) and both were

The young woman said she spoke to the other victim of Drummond’s unprovoked attacks at the Greengate Hotel (pictured) and both were “very frustrated” with the court’s decision

Anti-violence campaigner Tarang Chawla pushed for Drummond’s “cancellation” but said the court had told the perpetrator there are “no material consequences for his unacceptable actions”.

“He should be required to get men’s behavior modification, emotional intelligence, and anger management therapy,” he said.

Catalina Politi, whose son David Cassai was killed in a one-sided attack south of Melbourne in 2012, said it was up to ‘all of us’ – not just schools or governments to change anything.

“People don’t realize the devastation, the trauma, the injuries caused by these incidents,” said Stop’s co-founder, One Punch Can Kill.

NSW Attorney General Mark Speakman said the way someone is dressed “doesn’t excuse violence” while noting that judges could not take convictions where they think it is appropriate.

He added: “This is not a finding that the perpetrator is innocent and, unless there are unusual circumstances, a non-conviction will not be repeated if there are additional offences.”

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