Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio is released from prison after completing a five-month sentence

Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio, 37, has been released from prison after serving a five-month sentence for burning a Black Lives Matter flag outside a black church.

Tarrio, who was also convicted of possessing an illegal rifle magazine, was caught with a garbage bag full of his belongings and a folder full of papers as he left the DC Central Detention Facility on Friday.

Despite previously claiming to have stepped down as leader of the far-right group, he wore a t-shirt that read “Free the proud boys by any means necessary.”

He greeted his mother and betrothed outside the DC Central Detention Facility with a big smile under his mask and received a swarm of media attention. The mother and son shared a warm hug as they celebrated his release and his mother took a load off his arms by taking the file folder from him.

He also hugged his fiancée while looking down on her lovingly as they spoke outside the facility.

Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves DC Central Detention Facility after serving five months in prison, quite on fire for wearing a #FreeTheProudBoys shirt

He was greeted by his mom and a wardrobe malfunction for forgetting to zip up his fly after his latest comic quest

He was greeted by his mom and a wardrobe malfunction for forgetting to zip up his fly after his latest comic quest

He was sentenced to five months in prison for burning a Black Lives Matter flag and for a gun violation

He was sentenced to five months in prison for burning a Black Lives Matter flag and for a gun violation

Tarrio seen with a Trump megaphone in December 2020

Tarrio seen with a Trump megaphone in December 2020

He spoke to the press before dragging his hefty bag of belongings to the car, where he then stuck his head out the window and fired a peace sign at reporters.

Tarrio has been in prison since September for stealing and burning the BLM flag from a black church, and for possessing high-capacity magazines in DC, even though local laws prohibit them.

He was convicted of burning a BLM flag from a black Methodist church and bringing a gun magazine that is banned in DC within the city limits.

Tarrio insisted he was unaware that the church he was targeted was home to a black congregation, insisting his behavior was only intended as a general protest against the anti-police violence group.

Just before putting himself in jail on September 6, Tarrio went to the Capitol. Tarrio snapped as he brandished the lighter in front of the US government seat in Washington DC Monday night.

He stood several hundred meters in front of the building, but used a technique called forced perspective to make it look like he was trying to set the building’s famous white dome on fire.

Tarrio posed for the photo shortly before going to a city jail after being convicted of burning a BLM flag from a black Methodist church, and for bringing in a gun magazine that is banned in DC within city limits.

Tarrio and an unnamed friend were filmed singing a sea song called A Drop of Nelson’s Blood as they walked to the gates, and had a hug before Tarrio left his friend to start his sentence.

A warm reunion: Tarrio was received with loving hugs from his fiancée (above) and mother

A warm reunion: Tarrio was received with loving hugs from his fiancée and mother (above)

A warm reunion: Tarrio received loving hugs from his fiancée (left) and mother (right)

He carried a large, heavy bag full of his remaining chief and a folder of newspaper clippings and loose-leaf papers.

He carried a large, heavy bag full of his remaining chief and a folder of newspaper clippings and loose-leaf papers.

He shot a peace sign at reporters as he drove away from DC prison

He shot a peace sign at reporters as he drove away from DC prison

Speaking to WUSA 9 reporter Eric Flack as he prepared to walk to the prison gate, Tarrio said, “I have nothing more to say to the members of that church or branch. I already apologized to them once…

“The same justice system that Black Lives Matter is fighting for is the same justice system that stands up for my arrest, and I find that hysterical.”

He added: ‘Yes, I set their property on fire and I apologized, but from what I heard from them, this was strictly political. They wanted to put the bad guy, the bad guy, in jail, and congratulations – they succeeded.’

The chairman of the Proud Boys, 37, had previously claimed he was “peaceful” by reporting midnight to a Washington DC jail to begin a five-month jail term.

Tarrio went to jail for hours after his lawyers filed a 67-page appeal calling for his sentence to be shortened.

His appeal said Judge Harold L Cushenberry’s sentencing treated Tarrio much more harshly than a sex offender named Irun Warner, who convicted Cushenberry for groping a woman’s buttocks in August 2021.

The extremist group leader received a swarm of media attention after his release

The extremist group leader received a swarm of media attention after his release

Cushenberry gave Warner a suspended sentence for sexual assault just two days after ordering Tarrio to spend 155 days in prison.

Tarrio’s appeal against his verdict read: “It is simply inexplicable how it would be justified to allow Mr. To sentence Tarrio to 155 days of executed imprisonment for burning a piece of cloth and possessing an ammunition supply device that contained no ammunition while the same judge sentenced another defendant just days later who sexually assaulted a victim to serve absolutely no jail time. ‘

The file also details how Judge Cushenberry’s daughter was baptized at Asbury Methodist Church in Washington DC — whose flag Tarrio admitted to destroying.

Cushenberry offered to back down from disclosing that information to Tarrio during the Proud Boy leader’s plea hearing on July 19, but was not asked to do so.

Tarrio apologized for the burning flag, saying he was unaware it came from the historically black church.

The banner was decorated with the name of the church’s website, but Tarrio, who is from Florida, told the court he had no idea what the web address was linked to.

His lawyers have also said Tarrio’s sentence was influenced by Cushenberry’s decision to hear testimonies from Asbury’s Reverend, the Rev. Dr. Lanther M Mills, who said parishioners were traumatized by the burning flag and labeled it racist.

Tarrio (pictured in September) pretended to be holding a lighter at the Capitol before turning himself in to a Washington DC prison in September to issue a five-month prison sentence

Tarrio (pictured in September) pretended to be holding a lighter at the Capitol before turning himself in to a Washington DC prison in September to issue a five-month prison sentence

He sold the Black Lives Matter flag of a black Methodist church (pictured)

He sold the Black Lives Matter flag of a black Methodist church (pictured)

Tarrio’s legal filing said Mills’ victim statement should not have been taken into account because prosecutors could not provide any evidence that Tarrio knew the flag came from a church.

The filing said Tarrio’s sentence is “unreasonably harsh and disproportionate when taking into account the purposes of the sentencing.”

It also highlighted how the sentence imposed on Tarrio exceeded the three-month incarceration the prosecutors recommended.

The BLM banner burning took place in December 2020.

He asked for early release, citing the inhumane condition and wanted to be placed under house arrest, but was rejected in November. The judge ruled that insufficient housing was not a reason to be released from prison.

“I’ve been to prison before and what I’ve seen here I’ve never seen anywhere else,” he wrote in his request. “This place must be closed immediately.”

He said he faced abuse by correctional officers, medical neglect and living in unsanitary conditions.

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