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Queen wears new Platinum Jubilee brooch

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The Queen debuted a new brooch inspired by the UK’s four nations as she lit the first of 3,500 beacons that span the length and breadth of Britain in tribute to her 70 years on the throne today.

Her Majesty, 96, looked effortlessly elegant in a jade green Stuart Pravin crepe coat with a printed silk dress in shades of jade and taupe when attending the lighting of the beacons event at Windsor Castle. 

The monarch, who walked slowly and slightly gingerly using her by now familiar walking stick, sported a special new Platinum Jubilee brooch commissioned by the Goldsmiths’ Company as a gift to Her Majesty to mark her seven decades of service.

The brooch was inspired by the four nations which make up the UK, which are represented by four diamond swirls and the national flowers: the rose, the thistle, the daffodil and the shamrock.

It also includes the lily of the valley, one of her favourite flowers and used in her Coronation bouquet.

It was announced by Buckingham Palace tonight that the Queen has with ‘great reluctance’ pulled out of Friday’s Platinum Jubilee thanksgiving service at St Paul’s Cathedral.

The monarch, who has been suffering with mobility issues, is said to have experienced ‘discomfort’ during today’s Trooping the Colour events, which kickstarted the four-day celebration to commemorate her 70-year reign.

Her Majesty, 96, looked effortlessly elegant in a jade green Stuart Pravin crepe coat with a printed silk dress in shades of jade and taupe when attending the lighting of the beacons event at Windsor Castle

The Queen (pictured) debuted a new brooch inspired by the UK’s four nations as she lit the first of 3,500 beacons that span the length and breadth of Britain in tribute to her 70 years on the throne today

The monarch, who walked slowly and slightly gingerly using her by now familiar walking stick, sported a special new Platinum Jubilee brooch commissioned by the Goldsmiths¿ Company as a gift to Her Majesty to mark her seven decades of service

The monarch, who walked slowly and slightly gingerly using her by now familiar walking stick, sported a special new Platinum Jubilee brooch commissioned by the Goldsmiths’ Company as a gift to Her Majesty to mark her seven decades of service

Tonight, the monarch made a third public appearance of the day to launch more than 3,500 flaming tributes to her 70-year reign by laying her hand on a specially created glittering Commonwealth of Nations globe.

The event formed part of a special dual ceremony with her grandson the Duke of Cambridge, waiting 22 miles away at Buckingham Palace where the beacon centrepiece – a 21-metre living ‘Tree of Trees’ sculpture – was subsequently illuminated in lights on the Queen’s command.

The monarch was greeted in the castle Quadrangle with a fanfare by the State Trumpeters at the Sovereign’s Entrance, close to her private apartments, at 9.30pm.

She was accompanied by her private secretary, Sir Edward Younqg, Lady-in-Waiting Lady Susan Hussey and equerry Lt Colonel Tom White of the Royal Marines.

Around 130 members of the Windsor Castle community who had gathered to watch the ceremony greeted the monarch, some waving flags.

The Commonwealth of Nations Globe – a blue globe, which sits inside a silver crown on a blue and gold cushion – was specially created for the Beacons project and was placed on a podium by five Yeoman Warders, led by Chief Yeoman Warder Peter McGowran.

The brooch was inspired by the four nations which make up the UK, which are represented by four diamond swirls and the national flowers: the rose, the thistle, the daffodil and the shamrock. Pictured, the Queen

The brooch was inspired by the four nations which make up the UK, which are represented by four diamond swirls and the national flowers: the rose, the thistle, the daffodil and the shamrock. Pictured, the Queen

The brooch also includes the lily of the valley, one of her favourite flowers and used in her Coronation bouquet. Pictured, the Queen, right

The brooch also includes the lily of the valley, one of her favourite flowers and used in her Coronation bouquet. Pictured, the Queen, right

The beaming Queen symbolically leads the lighting of the principal Jubilee beacon at Windsor Castle this evening

The beaming Queen symbolically leads the lighting of the principal Jubilee beacon at Windsor Castle this evening

The Queen touches the Commonwealth Nations Globe to start the lighting of the Principal Beacon outside of Buckingham Palace in London, from the Quadrangle at Windsor Castle

The Queen touches the Commonwealth Nations Globe to start the lighting of the Principal Beacon outside of Buckingham Palace in London, from the Quadrangle at Windsor Castle

As the sovereign placed her finger on the globe, bright white lights raced along the Quadrangle towards Windsor's famous Round Tower

As the sovereign placed her finger on the globe, bright white lights raced along the Quadrangle towards Windsor’s famous Round Tower 

It was created as a symbol representing The Queen’s previous Jubilees and includes elements of silver, gold, diamonds and platinum.

The stones in the Crown signify the coming together of the four nations of the United Kingdom in celebration of the Jubilee and were collected from the top of the four highest peaks – Mount Snowdon, Wales; Ben Nevis, Scotland; Slieve Donard, Northern Ireland, and Scafell Pike, England.

As the sovereign placed her finger on the globe, bright white lights raced along the Quadrangle towards Windsor’s famous Round Tower, before – by the magic of technology – travelling up the Tree of Trees in London.

Although it was a short ceremony, lasting less than 10 minutes, it was late due to the need for it to be dusk and came at the end of an extremely long and gruelling day for the elderly and increasingly frail monarch.

Afterwards she turned and walked slowly down the red carpet that had been laid across the gravel, extremely carefully, step by step.

When she was on the more even surface of the flagstones she picked up pace, stopping briefly to acknowledge some of the Windsor Castle residents who had come out to see her, who curtseyed and bowed.

Beacons will now be lit throughout the UK and across the Commonwealth, and sites including the Tower of London, Windsor Great Park, Hillsborough Castle and the Queen’s estates of Sandringham and Balmoral, and on top of the UK’s four highest peaks.

The first beacons will be lit in Tonga and Samoa in the South Pacific, and the final one in the central American country of Belize.

The Tree of Trees in London is part of the nationwide Queen’s Green Canopy project to create a ‘living legacy’ to the monarch by encouraging communities to plant thousands of new trees.

Placing the ‘Tree of Trees’ at the heart of the beacon lighting reflects the Royal Family’s long history of championing environmental causes and will pay a fitting tribute to Her Majesty’s 70 years of service to the nation.

The Queen was joined by Bruno Peek, who has overseen the Jubilee Beacons celebration.

It comes after the Queen has with ‘great reluctance’ pulled out of Friday’s Platinum Jubilee thanksgiving service at St Paul’s Cathedral, Buckingham Palace announced tonight. 

Prince William pictured smiling as he attended the Lighting Of The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace this evening

Prince William pictured smiling as he attended the Lighting Of The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace this evening

The Duke of Cambridge pictured this evening

Mike Bloomberg and Prince William attend The Lighting Of The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace

Mike Bloomberg and the Duke of Cambridge attend The Lighting Of The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace, pictured together, right 

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Sir Nicholas Bacon attend The Lighting Of The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Sir Nicholas Bacon attend The Lighting Of The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace

The 'Tree Of Trees', created by Designer Thomas Heatherwick, at The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace

The ‘Tree Of Trees’, created by Designer Thomas Heatherwick, at The Principal Beacon at Buckingham Palace

Members of the Yeoman Guard before the Queen symbolically led the lighting of the principal Jubilee beacon at Windsor Castle

Members of the Yeoman Guard before the Queen symbolically led the lighting of the principal Jubilee beacon at Windsor Castle

The monarch, who has been suffering with mobility issues, is said to have experienced ‘discomfort’ during today’s events, which kickstarted the four-day celebration to commemorate her 70-year reign. 

The Palace said: ‘The Queen greatly enjoyed today’s Birthday Parade and Flypast but did experience some discomfort.’ 

In a full statement a spokesperson added: ‘Taking into account the journey and activity required participate in tomorrow’s National Service of Thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral, Her Majesty with great reluctance has concluded that she will not attend.

‘The Queen is looking forward to participating in tonight’s Beacon lighting event at Windsor Castle and would like to thank all those who made today such a memorable occasion.’ 

The Queen has been forced to cancel a string of engagements in recent months and most recently missed the State Opening of Parliament, symbolically asking her son, Prince Charles, and grandson, Prince William, to stand in. 

Jubilee Beacons at Windsor Castle that were symbolically lit by Queen this evening - her third public appearance om Thursday

Jubilee Beacons at Windsor Castle that were symbolically lit by Queen this evening – her third public appearance om Thursday

Projections displayed on the front of Buckingham Palace depicting the Queen during The Lighting Of The Principal Beacon tonight

Projections displayed on the front of Buckingham Palace depicting the Queen during The Lighting Of The Principal Beacon tonight

A picture of the Queen is projected onto the front of Buckingham Palace ahead of the beacon lighting ceremony

A picture of the Queen is projected onto the front of Buckingham Palace ahead of the beacon lighting ceremony

But royal aides this week insisted that despite what they describe as ‘episodic’ mobility issues, the monarch is in good spirits and very much in charge behind the scenes.

The announcement that the monarch will not attend tomorrow’s service followed a jam-packed first day of the Platinum Jubilee weekend, which will end on Sunday with a special Pageant celebrating the life of the nation’s longest-reigning monarch.

Earlier today, Her Majesty followed tradition again this year and gave a nod to her military role by wearing her diamond-encrusted Brigade of Guards brooch for Trooping the Colour.

The Queen has worn the brooch to almost every Trooping the Colour since 1987, when she stopped wearing uniform to the birthday parade.  

Created for Queen Mary, the diamond piece combines the badges of the five regiments of the British and Commonwealth armies, which include Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish, and Welsh Guards. 

The five symbols are enclosed in an oval frame with the Latin phrase, ‘Quinque Juncta In Uno,’ which translates in English to ‘five joined as one.’   

Earlier today, Her Majesty followed tradition again this year and gave a nod to her military role by wearing her diamond-encrusted Brigade of Guards brooch

Earlier today, Her Majesty followed tradition again this year and gave a nod to her military role by wearing her diamond-encrusted Brigade of Guards brooch

The brooch is made out of natural diamonds, and combines the badges of the five regiments of the British and Commonwealth armies, which include Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish, and Welsh Guards

The brooch is made out of natural diamonds, and combines the badges of the five regiments of the British and Commonwealth armies, which include Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish, and Welsh Guards

The Brigade of Guards Brooch was originally created for Queen Mary, the Queen’s grandmother, and it’s been in the royal family for more than a century. 

A replica was created for Queen Mary’s daughter, Princess Mary, and was presented to her by the Brigade of Guards for her wedding in 1922. 

The Queen rode a horse in the annual parade until 1987, and was also required to wear uniform. But when she stopped riding in the event and started to use a carriage she also started wearing her standard day wardrobe, which meant a brooch was also required. 

The Queen’s extensive personal jewellery collection is impressive and awe-inspiring and it’s said to include more than 300 pieces. She is said to be so fond of brooches that has approximately 98 different pieces in her collection. 

The monarch wears each brooch depending on its history or relevance to the occasion and they have either been gifted or commissioned for special occasions.

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