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Roman settlement flooded to create reservoir is fully visible after drought in Spain

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A Roman settlement that flooded to create a reservoir is now visible in its entirety after a prolonged drought lowered water levels in Spain.

The archaeological remains of the entire Roman camp, known as Aquis Querquennis, were revealed after the water level dropped in the As Conchas reservoir in Galicia, northwestern Spain.

Spain has suffered its worst drought in decades after a summer of heatwaves that have seen rivers and reservoirs plummet to dangerously low levels.

The Roman settlement in northern Spain, believed to have been built by the Romans in AD 75 before being abandoned around AD 120, was flooded in 1948 to form the As Conchas reservoir and has been largely submerged ever since. .

Only parts of the site are usually visible all year round, but this month, after weeks of record-breaking temperatures, the Roman camp has been unveiled in its entirety.

The archaeological remains of the entire Roman camp, known as Aquis Querquennis, were revealed after the water level plunged into the As Conchas reservoir in Galicia, northwestern Spain.

The Roman settlement in northern Spain, believed to have been built by the Romans in AD 75 before being abandoned around AD 120, was flooded in 1948 to form the As Conchas Reservoir and has since been largely submerged in the water

The Roman settlement in northern Spain, believed to have been built by the Romans in AD 75 before being abandoned around AD 120, was flooded in 1948 to form the As Conchas Reservoir and has since been largely submerged in the water

Only parts of the site are usually visible all year round, but this month, after weeks of record-breaking temperatures, the Roman camp has been unveiled in its entirety

Only parts of the site are usually visible all year round, but this month, after weeks of record-breaking temperatures, the Roman camp has been unveiled in its entirety

Extraordinary photos show the remains of the old fortified walls that surrounded the camp, as well as the remains of the buildings.

Spain’s prolonged drought has caused the reservoir’s water level to drop to just 49 percent of its maximum level, the report said. olive press.

The Aquis Querquennis had been used by the Romans as a temporary fortress and military barracks while they were building the historic Via Nova road.

The camp contained a temple, infirmary, and barracks that are thought to have housed 600 soldiers at any one time.

The Romans abandoned the site around AD 120 and it was forgotten until the 1920s when local archaeologist Florentino Lopez Cuevillas rediscovered the settlement and began excavations.

The settlement was later flooded in 1948 after the construction of a hydroelectric power station built downstream in a rural development project under the dictatorship of Francisco Franco.

The Aquis Querquennis had been used by the Romans as a temporary fortress and military barracks while they were building the historic Via Nova road

The Aquis Querquennis had been used by the Romans as a temporary fortress and military barracks while they were building the historic Via Nova road

The camp contained a temple, infirmary and barracks thought to have housed 600 soldiers at any one time

The camp contained a temple, infirmary and barracks thought to have housed 600 soldiers at any one time

The Romans left the site around AD 120 and it was forgotten until the 1920s when local archaeologist Florentino Lopez Cuevillas rediscovered the settlement and began excavations

The Romans left the site around AD 120 and it was forgotten until the 1920s when local archaeologist Florentino Lopez Cuevillas rediscovered the settlement and began excavations

Weeks of scorching drought in Spain that plunged water levels in reservoirs and reservoirs have also revealed an ancient church and prehistoric stone circle.

The receding water has uncovered the ruins of an 11th-century church in the mostly submerged village of Sant Roma de Sau, which was submerged in the 1960s when a nearby dam was built.

Normally, the bell tower of the church is the only visible sign of the village in the northeastern region of Catalonia.

On the basis of photos on social media and television reports, crowds of tourists fill the restaurants in the nearby village of Vilanova de Sau.

“It’s been years since the water level has been this low,” said 45-year-old Nuria Ferrerons during a recent visit to the site.

“We saw it on social media and we said ‘well, let’s see how it is,'” she added.

NOW: Receding water has uncovered the ruins of an 11th-century church in the mostly sunken village of Sant Roma de Sau, which was flooded in the 1960s when a nearby dam was built

NOW: Receding water has uncovered the ruins of an 11th-century church in the mostly sunken village of Sant Roma de Sau, which was flooded in the 1960s when a nearby dam was built

BEFORE: Normally the bell tower of the church is the only visible sign of the village in the northeastern region of Catalonia

BEFORE: Normally the bell tower of the church is the only visible sign of the village in the northeastern region of Catalonia

Two tourists on a canoe paddle through an arch of the church, which is fenced off to prevent people from getting too close due to the risk that the ruins could collapse.

“Normally you only see the clock tower,” said Sergi Riera, who came to see “something that hasn’t been seen for years.”

In Spain’s western region of Extremadura, the receding waters of the Valdecanas Reservoir have revealed a prehistoric stone circle on an islet that is normally submerged.

The circle of dozens of megalithic rocks, also known as the “Spanish Stonehenge,” was discovered by archaeologists in 1926, but the area was flooded in 1963 when the reservoir was built.

Archaeologists rave about the emergence of a prehistoric stone circle dubbed the 'Spanish Stonehenge', usually covered by water from a dam on July 28

Archaeologists rave about the emergence of a prehistoric stone circle dubbed the ‘Spanish Stonehenge’, usually covered by water from a dam on July 28

Officially known as the dolmen of Guadalperal, the stone circle is currently in full view in a corner of the Valdecanas reservoir, in the central province of Caceres, where authorities say the water level has dropped to 28 percent of capacity.

Officially known as the dolmen of Guadalperal, the stone circle is currently in full view in a corner of the Valdecanas reservoir, in the central province of Caceres, where authorities say the water level has dropped to 28 percent of capacity.

Officially known as the dolmen of Guadalperal, the site is believed to date back to 5000 BC.

After a prolonged dry spell, Spain’s reservoirs – which supply water to cities and farms – have a capacity of just under 36 percent, according to figures from the Environment Ministry for August.

Climate change has left parts of Spain at its driest in more than 1,000 years, and winter rains are expected to further diminish, according to a study published in July by the journal Nature Geoscience.

In Italy, receding water levels in Rome’s Tiber River have also uncovered the remains of the ancient bridge of Nero.

The bridge was built in the first century under Emperor Nero so that he could visit his properties on the right bank of the river, including the villa of his mother Agrippina.

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