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Scottish farmers form guard of honor for the queen: tractors line the road as her coffin passes by

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Scottish farmers have paid their respects to the Queen by plotting her processional route with dozens of tractors.

The Guard of Honor lined both sides of the road as the procession passed through the Aberdeenshire countryside on its way to Edinburgh.

The Queen’s casket left Balmoral this morning in a black Mercedes Benz to begin the six-hour journey to the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the monarch’s official Scottish residence.

With a single motorcyclist in the lead, the procession of six vehicles moved at a stately pace past the row of colorful agricultural vehicles on the first leg of the journey from Balmoral to Aberdeen.

Some saluted their front loaders as the Queen’s coffin, draped in the Royal Standard of Scotland and wreathed in white flowers, passed by.

Some had their fore-loaders saluted like the queen’s coffin, draped in the Royal Standard of Scotland and with a wreath of white flowers on it, past

Tractors lined both sides of the road as the Queen's procession passed through the Aberdeenshire countryside on its way to Edinburgh

Tractors lined both sides of the road as the Queen’s procession passed through the Aberdeenshire countryside on its way to Edinburgh

People commented on what a “beautiful gesture” it was, with one social media user saying it was a “very fitting tribute to a much-beloved queen.”

Another added: “Simple messages from ordinary people, so sincere and patriotic.”

This morning the Queen’s oak casket was carried to a hearse by six gamekeepers from the Balmoral Estate, after they had had time to say goodbye.

The coffin then began its 170-mile journey to Edinburgh, with Princess Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence closely followed in a state Bentley.

Hundreds lined the main street as the Queen’s casket was wheeled slowly through Ballater, the village closest to the Balmoral Estate, where many locals considered her a neighbor.

The Queen and her family can often be seen in the village on her beloved Royal Deeside, where she has visited since childhood and where the Royal Family is given the space to be themselves.

Many shops in the picturesque Victorian village displayed photos of the Queen in their windows as a tribute.

The hearse passed Glenmuick Church where Reverend Davi Barr had rung the church bells 70 times after her death was announced.

There was impeccable silence as the funeral procession passed through the village.

Benefactors who had waited patiently for the opportunity to pay their respects bowed their heads as others saluted as the hearse drove slowly by.

A gloomy Princess Royal in a Bentley limousine behind the Queen's hearse as it traveled through Aberdeenshire and into Edinburgh

A gloomy Princess Royal in a Bentley limousine behind the Queen’s hearse as it traveled through Aberdeenshire and into Edinburgh

Hundreds lined the main street as the Queen's casket was slowly wheeled through Ballater, the village closest to the Balmoral Estate

Hundreds lined the main street as the Queen’s casket was slowly wheeled through Ballater, the village closest to the Balmoral Estate

Afterwards, Margaret MacKenzie from Inverness said: ‘It was very dignified. It was nice to see so many people coming to support and pay their respects.’

Elizabeth Taylor, from Aberdeen, had tears in her eyes as she thought of what she had just seen.

She said: ‘It was very emotional. It was respectful and showed what they think of the Queen.

“She certainly served this country, even until a few days before her death.”

Guest house manager Victoria Pacheco said: ‘She meant so much to the people in this area. People were crying, it was great to see.’

She said guests were overwhelmed when news broke of the Queen’s death last week.

Elizabeth Taylor, from Aberdeen, had tears in her eyes as she thought of what she had just seen.

She said: ‘It was very emotional. It was respectful and showed what they think of the Queen.

“She certainly made this country subservient until a few days before her death.”

Families with young people began to gather in the city from 7 a.m.

The hearse passed Glenmuick Church where Reverend Davi Barr had rung the church bells 70 times after her death was announced

The hearse passed Glenmuick Church where Reverend Davi Barr had rung the church bells 70 times after her death was announced

Crowds lined the A90 through Angus to watch the convoy of cars pass on their way to Edinburgh

Crowds lined the A90 through Angus to watch the convoy of cars pass on their way to Edinburgh

Nursing Elaine Reid stood with her sons Innis (11) and Darragh (16) wrapped in tartan in the street near Glenmuick Church.

She explained that she was happy to get up early and make the hour-long drive from their Buckie home so her children could remember the Queen.

Elaine, 40, told MailOnline: ‘We came here today to pay our respects because the Queen has spent her entire life in the service of our country. So this is the least we can do.

“And I wanted the kids to be here so they can remember this day and tell their kids they were here to say goodbye to the Queen.”

Many also traveled through the night to secure a spot near the historic Palace of Holyroodhouse, where the Queen’s coffin will arrive around 4pm after traveling through Aberdeen, Dundee, Perth and Fife.

A massive security operation began in the Scottish capital as officials prepared for an unprecedented influx of visitors.

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II lies in state for 24 hours in Edinburgh's St Giles' Cathedral.  Officials are photographed outside the church on Saturday as they prepare for the procession carrying her body

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II lies in state for 24 hours in Edinburgh’s St Giles’ Cathedral. Officials are photographed outside the church on Saturday as they prepare for the procession carrying her body

Soldiers will guard the chest around the clock during visits.  Members of the royal family are also expected to take turns keeping watch, a tradition known as the Vigil of the Princes.  Princes Edward and Charles (pictured) both guarded the Queen Mother's coffin in 2002

Soldiers will guard the chest around the clock during visits. Members of the royal family are also expected to take turns keeping watch, a tradition known as the Vigil of the Princes. Princes Edward and Charles (pictured) both guarded the Queen Mother’s coffin in 2002

Early today, officers called up from across Scotland began taking up positions along the city’s famous Royal Mile, which runs between the palace and Edinburgh Castle.

Residents have been warned to expect “significant disruption” as a series of major roads in the city were closed to allow the courage and as part of security guards to enter.

On Monday, a procession will move up the Royal Mile to St Giles’ Cathedral, where Her Majesty’s coffin will remain for 24 hours and benefactors will be able to come and pay their respects.

Officials say there will be a queuing system and security checks. Mourners have to take into account a number of hours in line. The use of mobile phones is restricted and photography and recording is strictly prohibited.

Members of the royal family, including King Charles III, will guard the coffin from 7:20 p.m. Monday as it is laid out in a tradition known as the Vigil of the Princes.

Britons can also pay their respects to the Queen at Westminster Hall in London from Wednesday. Her Majesty will be in state for ‘four clear days’ at Westminster Hall until the morning of her funeral on Monday, September 19.

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