Shoppers face ‘great reset’ with food prices rising 10 percent

Shoppers face ‘amazing reset’ with food prices rising 10 per cent as poultry owner says days of family buying whole chicken for £3 ‘coming to an end’

  • 2 Sisters Food Group founder has warned of rising food prices
  • Ranjit Boparan warned consumers could soon be hit by a ‘great food reset’
  • Poultry boss said shoppers ‘look at a different world from now on’










Customers across the country could see food prices rise by 10 percent as manufacturers grapple with rising energy costs and a shortage of truck drivers.

2 Sisters Food Group founder Ranjit Boparan warned consumers could soon be hit by an ‘amazing food reset’ and said the days when a family could buy a whole chicken for £3 ‘come to an end’.

The poultry owner went on to say that the sharp rise in gas prices, rising inflation and labor problems caused shoppers to “look at a different world from now on” and that rising food costs were now “inevitable”.

His comments come after a survey by the British Chambers of Commerce found that nearly two-thirds of British manufacturers are planning to raise their prices in the run-up to Christmas due to rising inflation.

Founder of 2 Sisters Food Group, Ranjit Boparan, said the time when a family could buy a whole chicken for £3 is ‘coming to an end’

Mr Boparan told The Telegraph: ‘In relative terms, a chicken is cheaper to buy today than it was 20 years ago.

‘How can a whole chicken cost less than half a liter of beer?

‘From now on you look into a different world where the shopper pays more.’

The businessman further claimed that his company’s 600 companies and 16 factories had already seen energy bills rise by 550 percent.

Mr Boparan has now urged companies to work with supply chains and customers to ‘solve these problems’.

Last week, a survey by the British Chambers of Commerce found that 62 percent of industrial companies expect to raise their prices in the next three months – the highest result since data collection began in the late 1980s and well above the previous record of 38 per cent in 2008.

The results suggest that families are poised for a Christmas crisis of rising costs as they prepare for what is already the most expensive time of the year.

A host of large companies have warned of inflationary pressures from labor shortages, rising energy costs and gaps in global supply chains, including Greggs, Hotel Chocolat and consumer goods giants Unilever and Reckitt.

The poultry owner said his company's 600 farms and 16 factories had already seen electricity bills rise.  (Stock Image)

The poultry owner said his company’s 600 farms and 16 factories had already seen electricity bills rise. (Stock Image)

“Practical inventory shortages and rising raw material costs fueled a historic rise in inflationary pressures in the third quarter,” said Suren Thiru, chief economics officer at the BCC.

Greggs released its results last week, warning that despite encouraging sales, it was facing increased costs due to staff shortages and food ingredients.

Hotel Chocolat – which has more than a hundred stores in the UK – said prices for customers across most of its range would rise by up to nine per cent due to more expensive ingredients, labor and transport.

But while many Britons fear a financial blow, Prime Minister Boris Johnson insisted he wasn’t worried about rising prices because he believed they would be temporary, insisting it was “not his job” to control every aspect of supply chains. the UK to resolve.

Asked about the situation at the Conservative Party conference, he told the BBC: “Actually, I think people have been worried about inflation for a long time and it hasn’t materialized.”

When pressed about the UK’s shortage of lorry drivers, he tried to divert attention back to the private sector, saying ‘it is not the government’s job to come in and try every problem in business and industry. to solve’.

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