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‘Stop quietly’ trend for micro-breaks actually makes employees BETTER at their jobs, study finds

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“Quietly quitting” is a trend that TikTok has adopted in recent weeks, with Gen Z employees doing the bare minimum at work to avoid burnout.

The trend has been largely criticized by experts, with one calling it a “short-term fix.”

However, a new study suggests that the trend may actually make employees better at their jobs.

Researchers at the West University of Timioara found that taking micro-breaks can energize and reduce fatigue at work.

“Micro-breaks are efficient at maintaining high levels of strength and relieving fatigue,” the researchers wrote in their study, published in PLOS ONE.

While micro-breaks did not appear to affect performance on tasks, the researchers found that longer breaks did.

Based on the findings, the researchers suggest that bosses should offer their employees a combination of micro-breaks and longer breaks.

Researchers from the West University of Timioara found that taking micro-breaks can increase energy and reduce fatigue at work (stock image)

What is ‘quiet stop’?

‘Stop quietly’ rejects the idea that work should take over your life and that employees should go beyond what their job descriptions imply.

This can take many forms, including rejecting projects based on interest, refusing to answer work messages outside of work hours, or simply feeling less involved in the role.

Source: Linkedin

In the study, the researchers reviewed 22 previously published studies examining the effects of micro-breaks — short breaks of 10 minutes or less — from tasks.

The tasks in the studies varied, but included job simulations, real work-related tasks, and non-work-related cognitive tests.

The nature of the micro-breaks also varied, including physical breaks, relaxing activities, and more engaging activities such as watching videos.

An analysis of the studies revealed that micro-breaks generally resulted in higher levels of strength and less fatigue.

While micro-breaks did not appear to affect performance on tasks, the researchers found that longer breaks did.

“The duration of the break was a significant covariate of the effect of microbreaks: the longer the break, the better the performance,” the researchers wrote.

This was especially the case for creative or administrative tasks.

“When trying creative problems that require a broader search for knowledge, individuals benefit from a period of putting the problem aside before further attempts are made to solve it,” the researchers explained.

Based on the findings, the researchers suggest that bosses should encourage employees to take regular micro-breaks to increase well-being, as well as longer breaks to improve work performance.

“Organizations can benefit from training to build personal resources and organizational capabilities and learn how and when to apply efficient energy management and recovery strategies,” the team wrote.

The findings could also have implications for people in education, according to the team.

Those who have embraced the concept claim that they have felt less stressed and have the same recognition

A TikToker, who uses the username @zkchillin (pictured), shared a now viral video explaining the concept

A TikToker, who uses the username @zkchillin (photo, left), shared a now viral video explaining the concept. Those who have embraced the concept claim that they have felt less stressed and have the same recognition

Temporarily shortening the workday to five hours IMPROVES employee productivity

Business experts and CEOs have found that five-hour workdays can improve productivity and improve overall well-being, as well as the “sweet spot” for when focus begins to wane.

Studies show that as our focus shifts, we become less motivated, make more mistakes and become easily distracted. That is why some companies opt for a five-hour workday.

The idea stems from a study of music training that inspired the “10,000-hour rule” – the concept that it takes so many hours to become an expert at something – but the researcher found that the “best” students only have four to practice five hours a year. day.

A number of companies have tested the five-hour workday, which has shown that the program has both positive and negative sides.

One success story is Tower Paddle Boards, which switched to a compressed hour model in 2015.

The staff worked from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. with no breaks, prompting them to increase output to meet early closing times – the company saw a 50 percent increase in productivity.

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They added: “Students learn the benefits of short breaks during individual study for optimal learning may be one of the goals of educational policies that increase student motivation and performance.”

The ‘quiet quit’ trend has become extremely popular in recent weeks, with thousands of videos about the practice appearing on TikTok.

But while the movement has gained momentum and appears to allow many young workers to stick strictly to their contract hours, a number of labor experts are urging caution.

Jill Cotton, Career Trends Expert at Glassdoor, told MailOnline: “Employees shouldn’t see this as a long-term solution to problems they have in the workplace.

“While you think you might just stop quietly and do the bare minimum, the people around you might think you’re literally showing your face, that you don’t like your job and want to hide behind others.

‘Is there a danger of losing your job if you quit quietly? I would say yes. It can seriously hurt your long-term career prospects.

“If you’re not looking for extra opportunities, access to training, interact with leaders and make your work known, just come in and leave, it’s hard to get anywhere.

“The other major danger of quietly quitting as a long-term strategy is that your experience can stall as your peers move forward, making it difficult to find another job.

And in future interviews, when hiring managers ask for examples of your performance, you may struggle to find answers if you do the bare minimum.

“This doesn’t mean the only way forward is to work yourself to the bone or burn yourself out, but if you find yourself wanting to step out of your role, think about why this might be.” and talk to your colleagues. line manager.’

Similarly, Charlotte Davies, career expert at LinkedIn, added: “The quiet stop trend is a short-term solution and doesn’t address the bigger problem of balancing your work and life priorities.

‘In an increasingly uncertain economic climate and a more difficult job market, it may not be the wisest move and could hinder your career.

“Progressive workplaces understand that employees with a better work-life balance can be more productive and willing to support you, so you don’t have to take matters into your own hands.

‘An open and transparent conversation with your manager is the best way to tackle this, so that you can set clear boundaries and better ways of working. However, if the conversation isn’t productive, it might not be the right role for you and it’s time to look for something new.”

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