The snakecatcher’s stark warning after seeing a wave of ‘oversized’ snakes in Sydney

Snake catcher’s stark warning after finding ‘oversized snake with a body as thick as a beer bottle’

  • Sean Cade, who runs Australian Snake Catchers, recently caught a six-foot snake
  • Over the Labor Day long weekend, he got 25 calls about spotted snakes
  • A dozen of them were Oriental Brown Snakes, and they were all five feet long
  • He noted that Red Belly Snakes he found have been a “fairly decent size”
  • Experts believe one of the reasons for the number of healthy snakes is due to the mouse infestation










A snake catcher has shared a stark warning to Sydneysiders about a spate of giant snakes after finding an “oversized snake with a body as thick as a beer bottle”.

Sean Cade, who runs the Australian Snake Catchers, was recently called upon to remove a six-foot-tall eastern brown snake from an estate in West Hoxton in western Sydney.

He revealed that he had been warned about many more Eastern Brown Snakes in the city, as well as Red Belly Snakes.

Over the Labor Day long weekend in early October, Mr. Cade received 25 calls from concerned individuals about snakes on their property.

“A dozen of them were Eastern Browns, and they were all five feet tall,” Cade told the Daily Mail Australia.

The Snake Catcher also noted that the Red Belly Snakes he’s found lately are also a “pretty decent size.”

Sean Cade (pictured), who runs the Australian Snake Catchers, was recently called to remove a six-foot-tall eastern brown snake from an estate in Sydney’s West Hoxton.

Although the snake catcher explained that there are not necessarily more snakes found, lately the snakes are larger than their average size.

“The average black snake people come to see is about three feet long, like a ten cent coin. An Eastern brown snake is probably the same size but they are 1.2 meters long.

“But I regularly find five footers of an Eastern brown snake — like a 20 cent coin — so they’re pretty thick,” Mr. Cade said.

Mr Cade added that the red belly snakes had a diameter like a ‘tangerine size’.

“For some reason, this year, more so than in years past, the snakes seem to be a lot bigger and a lot healthier,” Cade said.

CSIRO mouse expert Steve Henry said the mouse infestation, which was seen all over central and western NSW early in the year, contributed to the problem.

Mr Cade revealed that he had been warned about many more Eastern Brown Snakes in town, as well as Red Belly Snakes

Mr Cade revealed that he had been warned about many more Eastern Brown Snakes in town, as well as Red Belly Snakes

Over the Labor Day long weekend in early October, Mr. Cade received 25 calls from concerned individuals about snakes on their property

Over the Labor Day long weekend in early October, Mr. Cade received 25 calls from concerned individuals about snakes on their property

Mr. Henry told 9news.com.au, “The mice provide great food for snakes.”

“We’ll see a lot of healthy snakes, but not necessarily anymore.”

However, Mr Henry said there is still uncertainty about whether a new mouse infestation will hit the state.

“We see patchy reports of high mouse numbers, but farmers are also very proactive with bait, which helps to reduce numbers in a given area.”

The Snake Catcher also noted that the Red Belly Snakes he's found lately also have a

The snake catcher also noted that the red belly snakes he has found lately were also a “pretty decent size” and were “mandarin sized” in diameter.

CSIRO's MouseAlert website allows farmers and ordinary residents to report mouse sightings and highlights the high numbers in NSW and other states

CSIRO’s MouseAlert website allows farmers and ordinary residents to report mouse sightings and highlights the high numbers in NSW and other states

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