Australia

Why the Barefoot Investor is being accused of setting a ‘bad example’ for his children

The Barefoot Investor is being accused of not setting a good example for his children after he revealed he kept his phone by the front door with his wallet and car keys.

Scott Pape said he made the decision to leave his device on the front lines because he wants to set a good example for his kids about taking a break from technology.

“That means I keep my phone in a bowl by my car keys and wallet by the front door, and leave it there so I can stay in touch with my family without constant distractions,” he wrote in a column last month.

His comment struck a chord with a reader who claimed it was a foolish location to leave valuables.

“This is not a good example, given all the crime going on today,” Reg wrote on Sunday.

“You might as well put them at the main entrance.”

Reg advised the Barefoot Investor that he should place his valuables in the kitchen rather than near the front door.

Mr Pape responded by joking that it “certainly is dangerous out there.”

Mr Pape then suggested that statistics show that the number of home burglaries has decreased over the past decade

Mr Pape then suggested that statistics show that the number of home burglaries has decreased over the past ten years

Reg advised the Barefoot Investor that he should place his valuables in the kitchen rather than near the front door

Reg advised the Barefoot Investor that he should leave his valuables in the kitchen rather than by the front door

He then made a comment about Peter Dutton: “(*If you listen to Peter Dutton, who seems very angry and determined to be very angry.)”

Mr Pape stated that statistics show that the number of home burglaries has decreased over the past decade.

He wrote that according to the latest figures, only 2 percent of households have experienced a burglary.

“This figure has been on a downward trend for ten years and is much lower than when data collection began in 2008-2009, when it was 3.3 percent,” he wrote.

“It’s hardly Venezuela, Gonzuela.”

Mr Pape concluded his answer by saying that if he found a violent burglar in his house, he would prefer his wallet and car keys to be taken out of the tray.

“Instead of playing hide and seek with a machete,” he said.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics released a snapshot of Australia’s crime figures on Thursday, revealing that Queensland is the crime capital.

Approximately 289,657 Queenslanders were victims of crime in 2023, with more assaults and home burglaries than any other state.

NSW came in second with 259,171 incidents of crime, while Victoria was third with 194,090.

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