Why these stickers referencing Hitler are OUTRAGE in Melbourne, Australia

Why these stickers with references to Hitler are OUTRAGE in Melbourne as anti-vaxxers compare vaccine mandates to ‘medical apartheid’

  • Melbourne’s anti-vaxxers have started putting Nazi-themed stickers around the city
  • Stickers are star of David, image of Adolf Hitler and a syringe with a message
  • They compare themselves to the persecuted Jews in the Holocaust










Melbourne’s anti-vaxxers have started putting up stickers in the city controversially comparing themselves to Jews in the Holocaust, as they continue to protest against mandatory vaccinations.

Spotted around the Victorian capital in recent weeks, the stickers feature three images: the Star of David, Adolf Hitler and a syringe.

‘What is the difference between vaccination papers and a yellow star? 82 years. We are increasingly living under National Socialism. Stop medical apartheid,” the message reads.

The stickers have sparked outrage in the Jewish community, with community leaders calling on the government to take a stand against the propaganda.

Melbourne’s anti-vaxxers have started putting up stickers in the city, comparing themselves to Jews in the Holocaust as they continue to fight mandatory vaccinations

An anti-vaxxer mocks police posing as Adolf Hitler as he walks in front of a line of officers during Saturday's Worldwide Rally for Freedom in Melbourne

An anti-vaxxer mocks police posing as Adolf Hitler as he walks in front of a line of officers during Saturday’s Worldwide Rally for Freedom in Melbourne

They are placed on walls, street signs and intersections in the city, usually in areas with high foot traffic.

The chairman of the Anti-Defamation Commission said the comparison between anti-vaxxers and massacred Jews was “hateful and cruel.”

“To hijack the Holocaust, in which six million Jews and millions of others were massacred and burned, to suggest that Hitler’s Final Solution is comparable to life-saving vaccination efforts, is to downplay and downplay humanity’s most immense tragedy,” said Dr Dvir. Abramovich.

The group putting up the stickers seems to relate themselves to the White Rose, a group of students who led a brave and silent revolt against the Nazis.

The White Rose movement, which included students Sophie Scholl, Hans Scholl, Christopher Probst, Alexander Schmorell and Willi Graf, was based on a nonviolent mantra and led by a professor from the University of Munich.

Melbourne has become Australia's anti-vaccination capital as demonstrations continue in the Victorian capital against mandatory jabs - with similar scenes also seen in Sydney (pictured)

Melbourne has become Australia’s anti-vaccination capital as demonstrations continue in the Victorian capital against mandatory jabs – with similar scenes also seen in Sydney (pictured)

dr. Abramovich said the founding members of the White Rose movement would be shocked to hear of their group being drawn into a debate over vaccinations.

“Sophie Scholl and her brother Hans are probably turning in their graves at the sight of this moral outrage,” he said.

“Being denied entry to a pub so as not to spread a deadly disease does not equate to the horrors of being segregated in ghettos, or children being shot in the head, or mothers and fathers being gassed in Auschwitz.”

Melbourne anti-vax groups have made several comparisons between their struggles and those of the Jews in the 1940s, but ironically, the government says many of these protests were hijacked by white supremacists acting as pro-choice.

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